Odette Yousef Odette Yousef is a National Security correspondent focusing on extremism.
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Odette Yousef

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Odette Yousef headshot
Courtesy of Odette Yousef

Odette Yousef

Domestic Extremism Correspondent

Odette Yousef is a National Security correspondent focusing on extremism.

In her reporting, Yousef aims to explore how extremist ideas break into the mainstream, how individuals are radicalized and efforts to counter that.

Before joining NPR in August of 2021, Yousef spent twelve years reporting for member station WBEZ in Chicago, where she was most recently part of the Race, Class and Identity team. While there, she was reporter and host for Season 3 of WBEZ's investigative podcast, Motive. The podcast, which won a 2021 national Edward R. Murrow award, explores the emergence and spread of the neo-Nazi skinhead movement in the U.S. and its connections to the far right extremism of today. Yousef was also part of a team that won a 2016 National Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Continuing Coverage, and she received a 2018 Studs Terkel Community Media Award. Prior to joining WBEZ, Yousef reported at WABE in Atlanta.

Born and raised in the Boston area, Yousef received a Bachelor of Arts in economics and East Asian studies from Harvard University. She is based in Chicago.

Story Archive

Counterterrorism researchers say they lack the data to prevent future violence

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31 members of a white nationalist group were arrested for planning to riot at Pride

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Law enforcement detains and arrest 31 members of the white nationalist group Patriot Front on suspicion of conspiracy to riot after they were removed from a U-Haul truck near the LGBTQ community's Pride in the Park event in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, June 11, 2022. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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31 members of the white nationalist Patriot Front arrested near an Idaho Pride event

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The Proud Boys indictment comes as political violence evolves

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Crosses adorn a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims at Robb Elementary School. NPR has not independent verified the names. CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images

The Uvalde shooting conspiracies show how far-right misinformation is evolving

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Social justice group examines how deeply the far-right has penetrated state politics

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Soon after the Uvalde shooting, conspiracy theories took off among the far right

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People gather at the scene of a mass shooting at Tops Friendly Market at Jefferson Avenue and Riley Street on Monday, May 16, 2022 in Buffalo, NY. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Alleged Buffalo shooter's digital log lays out the 6 months leading up to the attack

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Hundreds of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" march down East Market Street toward Emancipation Park during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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How is the 'Great Replacement' theory tied to the Buffalo shooting suspect?

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The shooter in Buffalo, N.Y., appeared to have become radicalized online

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Weaver and the Ruby Ridge standoff contributed to the evolution of the radical right

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Supremacy movements unite over abortion restriction, though for different reasons

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