Odette Yousef Odette Yousef is a National Security correspondent focusing on extremism.
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Odette Yousef

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Odette Yousef headshot
Courtesy of Odette Yousef

Odette Yousef

Domestic Extremism Correspondent

Odette Yousef is a National Security correspondent focusing on extremism.

In her reporting, Yousef aims to explore how extremist ideas break into the mainstream, how individuals are radicalized and efforts to counter that.

Before joining NPR in August of 2021, Yousef spent twelve years reporting for member station WBEZ in Chicago, where she was most recently part of the Race, Class and Identity team. While there, she was reporter and host for Season 3 of WBEZ's investigative podcast, Motive. The podcast, which won a 2021 national Edward R. Murrow award, explores the emergence and spread of the neo-Nazi skinhead movement in the U.S. and its connections to the far right extremism of today. Yousef was also part of a team that won a 2016 National Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Continuing Coverage, and she received a 2018 Studs Terkel Community Media Award. Prior to joining WBEZ, Yousef reported at WABE in Atlanta.

Born and raised in the Boston area, Yousef received a Bachelor of Arts in economics and East Asian studies from Harvard University. She is based in Chicago.

Story Archive

The story of January 6 goes beyond a single day

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Why fringe movements now include middle-class Americans with jobs and families

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Amateur sleuths help to identify hundreds of suspected Jan. 6 rioters

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Millions sympathize with the rioters who attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6, survey finds

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Defense officials announce new rules to counter extremism within the U.S. military

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The Pentagon has announced new rules to counter extremism within the U.S. military

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Far right is using Twitter's new policy against extremism researchers and activists

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White nationalists must pay $25 million in damages for their part in deadly Va. rally

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The suspect in the Wis. Christmas parade attack has a previous criminal record

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Far right extremists herald Kyle Rittenhouse's acquittal

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Armed participants walk at a Proud Boys rally with other right-wing demonstrators in September 2020 in Portland, Ore. Far-right groups celebrated the verdict in the Rittenhouse trial. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

For far-right groups, Rittenhouse's acquittal is a cause for celebration

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Rittenhouse verdict could be interpreted as a 'permission slip' by some extremists

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A demonstrator wears a badge for the extremist group the Oath Keepers on a protective vest during a protest outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., the day before the Capitol siege. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Active-duty police in major U.S. cities appear on purported Oath Keepers rosters

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White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters as they enter Emancipation Park during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Hate on trial in Virginia, four years after deadly extremist rally

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