Quil Lawrence David Aquila ("Quil") Lawrence is an award-winning correspondent with NPR News.
David Gilkey/NPR
Quil Lawrence
David Gilkey/NPR

Quil Lawrence

Veterans Correspondent

David Aquila ("Quil") Lawrence is an award-winning correspondent for NPR News, covering the millions of Americans who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as they transition to life back at home.

Previously, Lawrence served as NPR's Bureau Chief in Kabul. He joined NPR in 2009 as Baghdad Bureau Chief – capping off ten years of reporting in Iraq and all the bordering countries. That experience made the foundation for his first book Invisible Nation: How the Kurds' Quest for Statehood is Shaping Iraq and the Middle East, published in 2008.

Before coming to NPR, Lawrence was based in Jerusalem, as Middle East correspondent for The World, a BBC/PRI co-production. For the BBC he covered the fall of the Taliban in December 2001 and returned to Afghanistan periodically to report on development, the drug trade and insurgency.

Lawrence began his career as a freelancer for NPR and various newspapers while based in Bogota, Colombia, covering Latin America. Other reporting trips took him to Sudan, Morocco, Cuba, Pakistan and Iran.

A native of Maine, Lawrence studied history at Brandeis University, with concentrations in the Middle East and Latin America. He is fluent in Spanish and conversant in Arabic.

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Story Archive

Why It's Notable That A Slew Of New Members Elected To Congress Are Military Veterans

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Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert Wilkie said his department is on the mend after a tumultuous 2018. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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After A Year Of Turmoil, New VA Secretary Says 'Waters Are Calmer'

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Pittsburgh Community Reels Following Mass Shooting At Synagogue

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Pittsburgh Holds Vigil To Honor Victims In Synagogue Shooting

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Major Investigation Underway After Suspicious Packages Mailed To Government Officials

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Post-Michael: Hard-Hit Florida Residents Consider Whether To Rebuild

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Rescue Workers Still Trying To Find Hurricane Survivors In Mexico Beach, Fla.

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Jason Kander addresses a rally last year. He withdrew from the race for mayor of Kansas City, Mo., on Tuesday, saying he suffered from PTSD related to his military service in Afghanistan. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

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Kansas City Mayoral Candidate Jason Kander Drops Out, Citing PTSD

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Army Maj. D.J. Skelton in his garage at home in Monterey, Calif. In November 2004, insurgents ambushed Skelton's platoon during the second battle of Fallujah in Iraq. Two rocket propelled grenades hit the concrete next to him. What really should have killed him was a fragment that entered his right cheek, destroyed the roof of his mouth and exited his left eye. Jason LeCras for NPR hide caption

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Army Maj. D.J. Skelton Wants You To Look Him In The Eye

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VA Will Try Again To Make Its Health Records Compatible With Pentagon's

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Murder Trial Of Blackwater Guard Ends In Mistrial

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