Quil Lawrence Quil Lawrence is a New York-based correspondent for NPR News, covering veterans' issues nationwide.
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Villagers shout anti-U.S. slogans after a U.S.-led raid in Wardak, Afghanistan, that killed three civilians two weeks ago. A crowd of about 300 villagers yelled "Death to the United States" and blocked a main road in eastern Afghanistan. Rahmatullah Naikzad/AP hide caption

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Rahmatullah Naikzad/AP

Women walk at an outdoor market in downtown Kabul. The resurgent Taliban and several recent executions in accordance with an extreme interpretation of Shariah law have human-rights activists worried, particularly for women. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

Hall rests during a recent patrol in Ali Abad, in northern Afghanistan, with a platoon of soldiers who live with the Afghan national police. Quil Lawrence/NPR hide caption

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A Canadian soldier jumps over a ditch during a patrol in Afghanistan's Kandahar province in June. Canadian troops are expected to leave Afghanistan in 2011. Anja Niedringhaus/AP hide caption

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Anja Niedringhaus/AP

As Afghan Allies Reposition, U.S. Role Evolves

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U.S. Army 1st Lt. Mike Kehoe (right) sits down for a chat with a village elder and the local police chief in Ali Abad, Kunduz. Quil Lawrence/NPR hide caption

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Taliban Return To Northern Afghanistan

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A Marine carry team lifts a transfer case containing the remains of Cpl. Paul J. Miller at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on July 21. Miller, of Traverse City, Mich., was killed by a roadside bomb blast while on patrol in Afghanistan. July was the deadliest month for U.S. troops in the nearly nine-year-old war. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

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Steve Ruark/AP

In Afghanistan, No Shortage Of Suicide Bombers

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (right) is greeted by Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai in Kabul on Monday, a day ahead of the international donors' conference. Paul J. Richards/AP hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AP