Aaron Scott Aaron Scott is co-host of NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave.
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Aaron Scott

Kate Madden
Aaron Scott headshot
Kate Madden

Aaron Scott

Host, Short Wave

Aaron Scott (he/him) is co-host of NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave. The show is a curiosity-fueled voyage through new discoveries, everyday mysteries and the personal stories behind the science.

Prior to joining NPR in 2022, Scott was a producer/reporter for Oregon Public Broadcasting's science and environment team and the nature TV show Oregon Field Guide, where he climbed mountains with microbiologists, bushwhacked old-growth forests with ornithologists, snorkeled remote rivers with conservationists and otherwise wandered the natural wonders of the Pacific Northwest.

In 2020, Scott reported and hosted OPB's 10-part podcast Timber Wars, which told the story of how a small group of scientists and environmentalists forever changed the way we see — and fight over — forests and the natural world. With original music by Laura Gibson (the first musician to play a Tiny Desk concert), the podcast has been incorporated into college curricula around the country and won multiple awards, including being the first audio work to receive the MIT Knight Science Journalism Program's Victor K. McElheny Award.

On the creative flip side, Scott spent a number of years producing OPB's weekly arts radio show, State of Wonder; was the arts editor at Portland Monthly magazine; and directed publicity for the polyphonic little orchestra Pink Martini.

Scott's reporting has appeared on NPR, Radiolab, This American Life, Reveal, Here & Now, Out and elsewhere, and has won Gracie, Murrow, National Headliner, NLGJA and SPJ awards. He holds masters degrees in broadcast journalism and science journalism from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and a bachelor's in religious studies from Grinnell College. He grew up moving between the mountains of Colorado and the valleys of Oregon and now calls Portland home.

Story Archive

On May 3, 2022, a partnership led by the Yurok Tribe released two California condors, called A2 and A3, into the wild as part of a decades-long conservation effort." Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe hide caption

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Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe

The Quest To Save The California Condor

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A flower crafted by Nell Greenfieldboyce, at an American Society for Microbiology event highlighting agar art. Aidan Rogers/Edvotek hide caption

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Aidan Rogers/Edvotek

Beech trees seen from the forest floor. This image was taken in a forest named Bøkeskogen in Larvik city, Norway. Baac3nes/Getty Images hide caption

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Baac3nes/Getty Images

The Soyuz-2.1a rocket booster with cargo transportation spacecraft Progress МS-20 blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Friday, June 3, 2022. AP hide caption

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AP

A makeshift memorial at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas after a school massacre left 19 children and two teachers dead. Chandan Khanna / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna / AFP via Getty Images

Kenyan mountaineer James Kagambi (C), 62, is welcomed upon his arrival as the first Kenyan who reached the summit of Mount Everest, the world's highest peak of 8,849 meters, at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, on May 23, 2022. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

James Kagambi: The 62 Year Old Who Just Summited Everest

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Girl grimaces in front of a spoon of bitter medicine. timsa/Getty Images hide caption

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timsa/Getty Images

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

Love the bitter bite of dark chocolate, leafy greens or black licorice? Your genetics may be the reason why. Today on the show, host Aaron Scott talks to scientist Masha Niv about how our bitter taste buds work and how a simple taste test can predict your tolerance for some bitter things. Plus, what bitter receptors elsewhere in the body have to do with your health.

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

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Emotions — They're Not Just For Humans

Scientists have discovered the underpinnings of animal emotions. As NPR brain correspondent Jon Hamilton reports, the building blocks of emotions and of emotional disorders can be found across lots of animals. That discovery is helping scientists understand human emotions like fear, anger — and even joy.

Emotions — They're Not Just For Humans

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A beaver throws some twigs on top of his dam as his partner eats some grass near the shore. Taken in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Chase Dekker Wild-Life Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Chase Dekker Wild-Life Images/Getty Images

Knot research falls into a few categories: knot theory, a mathematical and theoretical look at knots; and a couple areas of research focused more on applications like DNA structures or surgical sutures in medicine Richard Drury/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Drury/Getty Images

All Tied Up: The Study of Knots

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An image of the planet Uranus taken by the spacecraft Voyager 2 as it flew by in January 1986. NASA/JPL hide caption

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NASA/JPL

Planetary Scientists Are Excited About Uranus

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The Environmental Cost of Crypto

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