Nick McMillan Nick McMillan is an associate producer who specializes in data with NPR's Investigations unit.
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Nick McMillan

Courtesy of Nick McMillan
Nick McMillan headshot
Courtesy of Nick McMillan

Nick McMillan

Associate Producer, Investigations Unit

Nick McMillan is an associate producer who specializes in data with NPR's Investigations unit. He utilizes data-driven techniques, video and motion graphics to tell stories. Previously, McMillan worked at Newsy on investigative documentaries, where he contributed to stories uncovering white supremacists in the U.S. military and the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rican school children. McMillan has a bachelor's in statistics from Rice University and a master's in journalism from the University of Maryland.

Story Archive

Thursday

Rice's whales are one of the most recently discovered whale species in the world — and already one of the most endangered. But protections for the Gulf of Mexico species have been repeatedly delayed. KL Murphy for NPR hide caption

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KL Murphy for NPR

Only 51 of these U.S. whales remain. Little has been done to prevent their extinction

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Tuesday

Delores Lowery was diagnosed with diabetes in 2016. Her home in Marlboro County, S.C., is at the heart of what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls the Diabetes Belt. Nick McMillan/NPR hide caption

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Nick McMillan/NPR

Many people living in the 'Diabetes Belt' are plagued with medical debt

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Saturday

A selection of the 1000 people who have been charged for the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol in 2021. Getty Images and Department of Justice hide caption

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Getty Images and Department of Justice

1,000 people have been charged for the Capitol riot. Here's where their cases stand

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Friday

Portions of a Norfolk Southern freight train that derailed in East Palestine, Ohio on Feb. 3 remained on fire the next day. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

When train crashes leak harmful chemicals, small town firefighters can be vulnerable

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Tuesday

NPR used social media and news reports to track four key men spreading misinformation about the 2020 election (from left to right): MyPillow CEO and longtime Trump supporter Mike Lindell, former high school math and science teacher Douglas Frank, former law professor David Clements, and former U.S. Army Captain Seth Keshel. Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters

Thursday

Map: NPR tracked four key influencers who appeared at least 308 events in 45 states and the District of Columbia, often with elected officials, candidates, and grassroots organizations. Nick McMillan/NPR hide caption

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Nick McMillan/NPR

Election deniers have taken their fraud theories on tour — to nearly every state

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