Robert Baldwin III Robert Baldwin III is an assistant producer for Weekend All Things Considered and a reporter covering developing legal issues.
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Robert Baldwin III

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Robert Baldwin III headshot
Courtesy of Robert Baldwin III

Robert Baldwin III

Assistant Producer, Weekend All Things Considered

Robert Baldwin III is an assistant producer for Weekend All Things Considered and a reporter covering developing legal issues. Baldwin was part of the team that won a 2019 National Press Club Award for the breaking news coverage of the Pittsburgh Tree of Life Synagogue shooting.

Before coming to NPR, he served as a Politics Fellow for the Huffington Post, where he frequently reported on Capitol Hill and the Supreme Court.

In addition to his legal coverage, Baldwin is a practicing attorney in Maryland and Washington D.C. where he manages a caseload of plaintiff-side employment discrimination, civil litigation and civil appeals. In 2018, he founded a civil rights law firm, Virtue Law Group. He is a board member of the Washington Bar Association, where he currently chairs the Young Lawyers Division. He has been recognized with several awards in his legal career included multiple "Young Lawyer of the Year" awards, and multiple "40 under 40" recognitions by the National Black Lawyers.

A native of Sacramento, California, Baldwin graduated cum laude from the illustrious Shaw University. He also holds law degrees from the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law.

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Lorton Reformatory, a former prison, is now a residential community in Lorton, Virginia. (Photo by: Robert Knopes/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images) Education Images/Education Images/Universal Image hide caption

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Education Images/Education Images/Universal Image

The Quiet Trend of Reimagining and Reusing Prisons and Jails

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Losing a pregnancy could land you in jail in post-Roe America

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J. Michael Luttig, former U.S. Court of Appeals judge for the Fourth Circuit, arrives to testify before the House committee that is investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Former federal judge warns of danger to American democracy

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Deborah Watts, a cousin of Emmett Till, the Black 14-year-old from Chicago who was abducted, tortured and lynched after he allegedly whistled at a white woman, holds a poster on March 11, in Jackson, Miss. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Experts warn the new anti-lynching law may not actually help prevent hate crimes

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People in Los Angeles walk in a silent protest march on April 9, 2012, to demand justice for the killing of Trayvon Martin. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Zaila Avant-garde attends the 2021 ESPY Awards on July 10 in New York City. She says she's enjoyed the traveling since winning the spelling bee. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

Zaila Avant-garde Talks About How She Came To Her Spelling Success

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Anita Hill speaks onstage at the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit in October 2018 in Laguna Niguel, Calif. Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for Fortune hide caption

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Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for Fortune

Anita Hill Reflects On Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Gender Equality Legacy

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Left to right: Fafa Ruffino, Mamani Keita, Niariu and Kandy Guira are members of the collective Les Amazones d'Afrique. Their new album, Amazones Power, is out now. Karen Paulina Biswell/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Karen Paulina Biswell/Courtesy of the artist

West African Supergroup Les Amazones D'Afrique Returns With 'Amazones Power'

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The remastered album mines Prince's creative era between Nov. 1981 and Jan. 1983. Allan Beaulieu/Courtesy of the artist. hide caption

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Allan Beaulieu/Courtesy of the artist.

Prince's '1999' Sees Another Life — This Time With 35 New Songs

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The members of SOL Development (Left to right): Brittany Tanner, Felicia Gangloff-Bailey, Karega Bailey and Lauren Adams. Brian Freeman /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Brian Freeman /Courtesy of the artist

Oakland Collective SOL Development Preserves The 'The SOL Of Black Folk'

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The Annie Merner Pfeiffer Chapel is seen on the campus of Bennett College in Greensboro, N.C. The college, one of two historically black colleges for women, is fighting to maintain its accreditation. Bennett College hide caption

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Bennett College

Facing Loss Of Accreditation Over Finances, Women's HBCU Raises Millions

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