Margaret Cirino Margaret Cirino is a production assistant at Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast.
Margaret Cirino, photographed for NPR, 6 June 2022, in Washington DC. Photo by Farrah Skeiky for NPR.
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Margaret Cirino

Farrah Skeiky/NPR
Margaret Cirino, photographed for NPR, 6 June 2022, in Washington DC. Photo by Farrah Skeiky for NPR.
Farrah Skeiky/NPR

Margaret Cirino

Production Assistant, Short Wave

Margaret Cirino (she/her) is a production assistant at Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast. Her job involves pitching, producing and forcing her virtual and in-person co-workers to play board games with her. She has a soft spot for reporting on cute critters and outer space (not at the same time, of course).

Cirino started as an intern on the Short Wave team in 2021 before working with TED Radio Hour and How I Built This as their joint intern in 2022. Now, she's back and excited to be making nerdy scientific audio.

Prior to NPR, Cirino double majored in physics and narrative studies at the University of Southern California. She was also on the USC Women's Rowing team. When she's not producing, you can find her making art, playing piano or futzing around at the climbing gym.

Story Archive

Smoke emerging from chimneys in Skutskär, Sweden. Gerhard Pettersson/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Gerhard Pettersson/EyeEm/Getty Images

What looks much like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth. NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI hide caption

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NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

On Wednesday, May 4th, 2022 a mix of masked and unmasked individuals shop at the Portland Farmers Market in Shemanski Park in Portland, OR. Leah Nash/The Washington Post / Getty Images hide caption

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Leah Nash/The Washington Post / Getty Images

BA.5: The Omicron Subvariant Driving Up Cases — And Reinfections

BA.5 is now the dominant SARS-CoV-2 subvariant in the United States. It's driving up COVID cases and hospitalizations across the country.

BA.5: The Omicron Subvariant Driving Up Cases — And Reinfections

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The flooding of the Saint John River in 2019 marks the second consecutive year of major flooding. Marc Guitard/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Guitard/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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A flower crafted by Nell Greenfieldboyce, at an American Society for Microbiology event highlighting agar art. Aidan Rogers/Edvotek hide caption

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Aidan Rogers/Edvotek

Beech trees seen from the forest floor. This image was taken in a forest named Bøkeskogen in Larvik city, Norway. Baac3nes/Getty Images hide caption

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Baac3nes/Getty Images

A makeshift memorial at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas after a school massacre left 19 children and two teachers dead. Chandan Khanna / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna / AFP via Getty Images

Green the Chow Chow sits in the grooming area at the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at The Piers on February 12, 2018 in New York City. The show is scheduled to see 2,882 dogs from all 50 states take part in this year's competition. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dog Breeds Are A Behavioral Myth... Sorry!

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Tampon and Calendar Carol Yepes/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol Yepes/Getty Images

Who Else Can See Your Period Tracker Data?

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A COVID Memorial Project installation in September, 2020 marked 200,000 lives lost in the COVID-19 pandemic. The official death toll in the U.S. is on the cusp of a million. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

How Vaccine Misinformation Spread Through The Parenting World

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Artist's impression of Dragonfly on Titan's surface. NASA/Johns Hopkins APL hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins APL

What Mount Kilimanjaro Has To Do With The Search For Alien Life

Understanding how life survives in extreme Earth environments could point to ways life can survive on other worlds. Astrobiologist Morgan Cable talks to host Emily Kwong about how her missions here on Earth have guided two upcoming NASA missions in search for alien life, not in a far off galaxy, but here in our solar system. The Titan Dragonfly and the Europa Clipper missions will each explore an ocean world in our solar system, where scientists believe we could find life--life that may be unlike anything we've seen before. Today on Short Wave, life as we know it - and life as we don't know it.

What Mount Kilimanjaro Has To Do With The Search For Alien Life

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In their research, Andrea Ford and Giulia De Togni found that period tracking app users valued the control over their personal health the apps enabled. Most users they spoke with see the commodification of their personal data as a tradeoff they're forced to make. Ana Maria Serrano/Getty Images hide caption

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Ana Maria Serrano/Getty Images

Composite image of the Perseus galaxy cluster using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, ESA's XMM-Newton and Hitomi, a Japanese-led X-ray telescope. X-ray: NASA/CXO/Fabian et al.; Radio: Gendron-Marsolais et al.; NRAO/AUI/NSF Optical: NASA, SDSS hide caption

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X-ray: NASA/CXO/Fabian et al.; Radio: Gendron-Marsolais et al.; NRAO/AUI/NSF Optical: NASA, SDSS