Anya Steinberg
Stories By

Anya Steinberg

Anya Steinberg

Story Archive

Friday

There's more plastic waste in the world than ever. So, where did the idea come from that individuals, rather than corporations, should keep the world litter-free? Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

Thursday

American lawyer and consumer activist Ralph Nader, whose book 'Unsafe at Any Speed', led to the passage of improved car safety regulations. He is at a Senate hearing at Washington triggered by his publication. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Keystone/Getty Images

Thursday

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

Thursday

MAHMOUD ZAYYAT/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

Keystone Features/Getty Images

Thursday

Amir Levy/Getty Images

Thursday

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Wednesday

Thursday

John M Lund Photography Inc/Getty Images

Thursday

WANG ZHAO/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: A young woman smells the blooms inside the branch of one of the cherry trees surrounding the Tidal Basin near the National Mall March 23, 2016 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Scent of History

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198908502/1229881709" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

New York Public Library

Thursday

Marc Piscotty/Getty Images

Thursday

KenCanning/Getty Images

Thursday

Hokyoung Kim

Thursday

Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Thursday

Planet Flem

Thursday

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Thursday

A 19th-century engraving of Cpt. Miles Standish and his men observing the 'immoral' behavior of the Maypole festivities of 1628 at Merrymount. ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images

Thursday

The Tom Olin Collection

Thursday

Red Lake Reservation is rare because the tribal nation owns all of its land

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1214978527/1214978528" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Wednesday

Nate Taylor (left) and Sylvia Fred (right), two of the co-founders of the Endazhi-Nitaawiging Charter School on Red Lake Reservation standing in front of the construction site for a new school building. Sequoia Carrillo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sequoia Carrillo/NPR