Laura Benshoff Laura Benshoff is a reporter covering energy and climate for NPR's National desk.
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Laura Benshoff

Laura Benshoff

Reporter, National Desk

Laura Benshoff is a reporter covering energy and climate on a temporary basis for NPR's National desk. Prior to this assignment, she spent eight years at WHYY, Philadelphia's NPR Member station. There, she most recently focused on the economy and immigration. She has reported on the causes of the Great Resignation, Afghans left behind after the U.S. troop withdrawal and how a government-backed rent-to-own housing program failed its tenants. Other highlights from her time at WHYY include exploring the dynamics of the 2020 presidential election cycle through changing communities in central Pennsylvania and covering comedian Bill Cosby's criminal trials.

Benshoff is originally from North Carolina and attended McGill University in Montreal, Quebec.

Story Archive

Abortion providers shift practices as states enact bans

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The Supreme Court may issue a ruling that could hurt Biden's climate change plans

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In an address to the nation, Biden renews his calls for gun control

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The gunman in the May 24 mass shooting at Robb Elementary in Uvalde, Texas, purchased an AR-15-style rifle from Daniel Defense online. Lisa Marie Pane/AP hide caption

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Lisa Marie Pane/AP

The story of what happened the day of the Uvalde shooting keeps changing

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Balloons and caution tape are seen at the entrance to Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday. Investigators had initially said a teacher left a back door propped open at the school, but that account has now shifted. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

What this moment before midterms means for the Biden administration's climate goals

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Much of the U.S. could see power blackouts this summer, a grid assessment reveals

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Veronica Stovall, left, helped her father, Joseph L. Davis, apply for a federally-funded energy-efficiency program in 2021. It turned up significant repair needs. Hannah Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Hannah Yoon for NPR

A low-income energy-efficiency program gets $3.5B boost, but leaves out many in need

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Dariya Medynska gathers with other members of the Voloshky Ukrainian dance ensemble before the International Spring Festival at North Penn High School in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. Rachel Wisniewski for NPR hide caption

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Rachel Wisniewski for NPR

A Ukrainian dance troupe in the U.S. fights disinformation, one high kick at a time

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An old-growth redwood tree named "Father of the Forest" in Big Basin Redwoods State Park, California in August 2020. Some trees in the park have been standing for 2,000 years. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Biden will order a study of old-growth forests in an Earth Day executive action

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You haven't been able to pump own gas in New Jersey since 1949. That might change

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