Laura Benshoff Laura Benshoff is a reporter covering energy and climate for NPR's National desk.
Stories By

Laura Benshoff

Laura Benshoff

Reporter, National Desk

Laura Benshoff is a reporter covering energy and climate on a temporary basis for NPR's National desk. Prior to this assignment, she spent eight years at WHYY, Philadelphia's NPR Member station. There, she most recently focused on the economy and immigration. She has reported on the causes of the Great Resignation, Afghans left behind after the U.S. troop withdrawal and how a government-backed rent-to-own housing program failed its tenants. Other highlights from her time at WHYY include exploring the dynamics of the 2020 presidential election cycle through changing communities in central Pennsylvania and covering comedian Bill Cosby's criminal trials.

Benshoff is originally from North Carolina and attended McGill University in Montreal, Quebec.

Story Archive

The Senate ratified a climate change treaty with rare strong bipartisan support

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124590392/1124590394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In October 2016, in Kigali, Rwanda, nations around the globe agreed to phase out a category of dangerous greenhouse gases widely used in refrigerators and air conditioners. In 2022, the U.S. took steps to formally ratify the agreement. Cyril Ndegeya /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cyril Ndegeya /AFP via Getty Images

Pennsylvania candidate for governor, state Attorney General Josh Shapiro, speaks about protecting abortion access during a news conference in Philadelphia, Wednesday, June 29, 2022. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Rourke/AP

Democrats lifted GOP opponents in the primaries. Some of those races now look close

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1123689607/1123689608" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Peter Petokas, from the Clean Water Institute at Lycoming College, and Michelle Herman, from The Wetland Trust, with a young hellbender they helped raise in captivity and released in 2018. Laura Benshoff/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Benshoff/NPR

Wildlife conservation tends to save charismatic species. That may be about to change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110852137/1122482255" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pipes that have been sitting for four years on the property of impacted landowner Maury Johnson, in Greenville, W.Va., on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2022. Carlos Bernate for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Bernate for NPR

West Virginians divided over natural gas pipeline despite Manchin's support

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1119911325/1121346573" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Blaming renewables for blackouts, which haven't happened, is "a way to forestall a transition that's underway, but needs to move faster than it is right now," said Shelley Welton of the University of Pennsylvania. Godofredo A. Vásquez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Godofredo A. Vásquez/AP

Renewable energy is maligned by misinformation. It's a distraction, experts say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110850169/1119192923" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Inflation Reduction Act includes tax credits for residential solar and battery storage systems, along with other measures aimed at encouraging individuals to cut their carbon emissions. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Ruttle/AP

3 ways the Inflation Reduction Act would pay you to help fight climate change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1116769983/1117015512" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Volunteers help remove flood debris from Messenger Florist and Gifts in Whitesburg, Ky., on Friday. Hundreds of families have moved into government-run shelters, according to Gov. Andy Beshear's office. Jeff Dean for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Dean for NPR

Eastern Kentucky's people looked for a fresh start after coal. Then came the floods

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1116036174/1116036175" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin struck a deal to include energy and climate spending in a party-line reconciliation bill. Eric Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Climate experts experience an odd sensation after the Manchin budget deal: optimism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114216967/1114335482" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Congress Democrats appear ready to pass new legislation with focus on climate change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114375568/1114395056" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As extreme weather worsens, some policymakers are choosing to not act

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112113031/1112116301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Joe Manchin pulled the plug on major spending to address climate change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111771318/1111771319" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Coal-fired power plants, like the Longview Power Plant in Maidsville, W.Va., have struggled financially in recent years. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Supreme Court handed coal power a win. But experts say that won't save it

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110190440/1110577459" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nuclear power is seeing support as a way to avert climate disaster, but faces hurdles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110338528/1110338529" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript