Zeninjor Enwemeka Zeninjor Enwemeka is a temporary reporter for Planet Money.
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Zeninjor Enwemeka

Zeninjor Enwemeka

Temporary Reporter, Planet Money

Zeninjor Enwemeka is a temporary reporter for Planet Money. Enwemeka has spent several years covering business, tech and culture as well as transportation at Member station WBUR in Boston. She's reported on disparities in mortgage lending, Mexico City's bus system and what US cities can learn from it, and the economic impact of COVID on workers, businesses and entrepreneurs.

Enwemeka has also examined the role of chief diversity officers, how businesses responded to racial justice protests, equity in the cannabis industry and how ventilation works on public transit. She's done stories on the 'Black Panther' craze, food waste tech, hacking elections and Space Force. She has received regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for her reporting on the future of work and protest coverage.

Enwemeka previously worked at The Boston Globe as a breaking news writer and digital producer. She was part of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize-winning team for The Boston Globe's breaking news coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings. She was also an adjunct lecturer at Boston University, where she taught a class on multimedia journalism. Enwemeka is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.

Story Archive

Thursday

Encore: Cities like Tulsa, Okla., are paying people to move there

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Thursday

Cities like Tulsa in Oklahoma are paying people to move there

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Saturday

Health Experts: Trump Ban On Flavored E-Cigarettes Would Have Little Impact

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Wednesday

U.S. Cities Look To Mexico City's Bus System As Possible Model

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Friday

Philosophy professor Abby Everett Jaques of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology created a class called Ethics of Technology to help future engineers and computer scientists understand the pitfalls of tech. Courtesy of Kim Martineau, MIT Quest for Intelligence hide caption

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Courtesy of Kim Martineau, MIT Quest for Intelligence

Solving The Tech Industry's Ethics Problem Could Start In The Classroom

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Tuesday

Harvard Business School Moves To Study More Diverse Cases

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Wednesday

Ride-Hailing App Geared Toward Women Debuts In Boston

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Saturday

Peter Reynolds, owner of Blue Bunny Books in Dedham, Mass., says he hopes the unique atmosphere will keep customers coming to independent bookstores like his. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR