Wailin Wong Wailin Wong is a host of The Indicator from Planet Money.
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Wailin Wong

Jamilla Yipp
Headshot of Wailin Wong
Jamilla Yipp

Wailin Wong

Host, The Indicator from Planet Money

Wailin Wong is a long-time business and economics journalist who's reported from a Chilean mountaintop, an embalming fluid factory and lots of places in between. She is a host of The Indicator from Planet Money. Previously, she launched and co-hosted two branded podcasts for a software company and covered tech and startups for the Chicago Tribune. Wailin started her career as a correspondent for Dow Jones Newswires in Buenos Aires. In her spare time, she plays violin in one of the oldest community orchestras in the U.S.

Story Archive

Friday

Timothée Chalamet and Zendaya in Dune: Part Two. Warner Bros. hide caption

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Warner Bros.

Thursday

The Israeli Minister of Finance reacts to the financial ratings agency Moody's decision to downgrade Israel's credit rating in March 2023. Maya Alerruzzo/AP hide caption

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Maya Alerruzzo/AP

Wednesday

Tuesday

TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images

How to make an ad memorable

Super Bowl ads this year relied heavily on nostalgia and surprise –– a few tricks that turn out to embed information into our brains. Today, neuroscientist Charan Ranganath joins the show to dissect the world of marketing to its biological fundamentals and reveal advertisers' bag of tricks.

How to make an ad memorable

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Friday

For lease sign in Los Angeles. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

JASPER JACOBS/BELGA MAG/AFP/Getty Images

Wednesday

A picture of the New Administrative Capital megaproject. It's one of Egypt's massive construction projects that's part of the president's economic vision. KHALED DESOUKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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KHALED DESOUKI/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

FTC cracks down on companies that glean location data without users' consent

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Monday

A recession is often met with political bickering and reactive measures. One proposal would change that by providing an automatic cash payment triggered when a recession hits. Alan Diaz/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Alan Diaz/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Friday

'The Indicator from Planet Money': The tensions behind the sale of U.S. Steel

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Thursday

Lindsay Whitehurst/AP

Why the FTC is cracking down on location data brokers

It's no secret — your phone knows where you are, and if that data exists, someone else might have it. Back in 2022, we covered the murky market for smartphone location data. Now, the Federal Trade Commission is cracking down on this multi-billion dollar industry. In today's episode, we explain why the agency is trying to ban a data broker from selling information tied to sensitive places like medical facilities.

Why the FTC is cracking down on location data brokers

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Wednesday

Lockheed Aircraft corporations' plant in Burbank, California back in 1939. By the end of the Cold War, nearly 14,000 jobs were terminated when Lockheed shut most of its operations. AP hide caption

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AP

How to transform a war economy for peacetime

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Tuesday

A Ukrainian artilleryman looks at a 155 artillery round. The ammunition has been the center of attention as the U.S. supplies it to war efforts in both Ukraine and Israel. Supplies of the artillery round are quickly becoming depleted. Libkos/Getty Images Europe hide caption

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Libkos/Getty Images Europe

Friday

Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Tumbling Chinese stocks and rapid Chipotle hiring

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Thursday

Julia Ritchey/NPR

How niche brands got into your local supermarket

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Tuesday

There is a lot of money in 401(k) plans. With a lot going into equities, these retirement investment make up roughly 10 percent of the stock market. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Monday

GJP/AP

Friday

'The Indicator From Planet Money': The lawsuit that could shake up the rental market

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Thursday

Carolyn Kaster/AP

Five tips for understanding political polls this election season

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Wednesday

A picture taken during an organized tour by Yemen's Houthi rebels on November 22, 2023 shows the Galaxy Leader cargo ship, seized by Houthi fighters two days earlier, docked in a port on the Red Sea in the Yemeni province of Hodeida. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Mid-East conflict escalation, two indicators

On today's show, we look at two indicators of the economic disruptions of the war in Gaza and try to trace how far they will reach.

Mid-East conflict escalation, two indicators

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Friday

Soon there's going to be a new and easier way to buy into cryptocurrency

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Jaquel Spivey, Angourie Rice and Auli'i Cravalho in Mean Girls. Jojo Whilden/Paramount hide caption

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Jojo Whilden/Paramount