Ximena Bustillo Ximena Bustillo is a multi-platform reporter at NPR covering politics out of the White House and Congress on air and in print.
Ximena Bustillo headshot
Stories By

Ximena Bustillo

Montana Monardes/Courtesy of Ximena Bustillo
Ximena Bustillo headshot
Montana Monardes/Courtesy of Ximena Bustillo

Ximena Bustillo

Reporter, Washington Desk

Ximena Bustillo is a multi-platform reporter at NPR covering politics out of the White House and Congress on air and in print.

Before joining NPR, she was an award-winning food and agriculture policy reporter and newsletter author at POLITICO covering immigration, climate, labor, supply chain and equity issues.

Bustillo got her start in journalism at the Idaho Statesman where she helped spearhead the state's Spanish-language coronavirus news coverage through articles and public web forums.

She is a graduate of Boise State University.

Story Archive

Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., speaks to members of the media after a House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol attack hearing last month. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A video of President Donald Trump recording a statement in the Rose Garden of the White House on Jan. 6 is played as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

A Guatemalan immigrant worker spreads lime while preparing fresh bedding for the cows at Stein Family Farms in Caledonia, N.Y on Mar. 8, 2017. Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Stephen Ayres (L), who entered the U.S. Capitol illegally on January 6, 2021, confers with Jason Van Tatenhove (R), who served as national spokesman for the Oath Keepers and as a close aide to Oath Keepers founder Stewart Rhodes, prior to their testimony during the seventh hearing by the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday afternoon. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Abortion rights opponents hold signs outside the Supreme Court on June 27, 2022. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Who and what is behind abortion ban trigger law bills? Two groups laid the groundwork

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110299496/1110799424" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Joe Biden speaks as New York Gov. Kathy Hochul appears on a screen during a virtual meeting with Democratic governors on abortion rights on Friday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Justice Stephen G. Breyer (Retired) administers the judicial oath to Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson in the West Conference Room at the Supreme Court Building. Her left hand rests on two bibles held by her husband, Dr. Patrick Jackson. Fred Schilling, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States hide caption

toggle caption
Fred Schilling, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

A video of then-President Donald Trump's motorcade leaving the Jan. 6 rally on the Ellipse is displayed as Cassidy Hutchinson, a former top aide to then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies about Trump's actions on that day. Shawn Thew/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Shawn Thew/Pool/Getty Images

Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, is seen in a video of her interview with the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 23. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Cassidy Hutchinson, former aide to Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol on Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP