Jessica Mendoza Jessica Mendoza is an editor on It's Been a Minute, where she edits stories and interviews for the podcast and for broadcast.
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Jessica Mendoza

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Tuesday

Trina. Amanda Howell Whitehurst for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Howell Whitehurst for NPR

Friday

The third episode in season four of the HBO hit 'Succession' has the dysfunctional Roys dealing with grief and death. HBO hide caption

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HBO

Death and grief in 'Succession'; plus, privacy and the abortion pill

This week, host Brittany Luse is joined by UC Berkeley Law professor Khiara Bridges to connect the dots between the recent legal battles over the abortion pill mifepristone and our constitutional right to privacy. Then, Linda Holmes of NPR's 'Pop Culture Happy Hour' stops by to chat about the television episode that still has our group chats in a chokehold, and how it eloquently captured the way we experience death and grief in real life.

Death and grief in 'Succession'; plus, privacy and the abortion pill

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Tuesday

Actor, director, and producer Tracee Ellis Ross. Academy Awards/Getty Images hide caption

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Academy Awards/Getty Images

Tracee Ellis Ross is an icon – and our favorite rich auntie

Tracee Ellis Ross is an icon. From playing the premiere Black bachelorette, Joan Carol Clayton, on Girlfriends to becoming America's mom as Bow Johnson on Black-ish, she's spent the past two decades portraying a paragon of Black womanhood on screen. More recently, Tracee's turned her focus toward uplifting the stories of real people – on her Hulu documentary Hair Tales, and with her new podcast, I Am America. Host Brittany Luse talks with Tracee about her long and varied career, how she tackles storytelling through documentary and what it means to have rich auntie energy.

Tracee Ellis Ross is an icon – and our favorite rich auntie

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Tuesday

Sangeeta Singh-Kurtz, senior writer at New York Magazine's The Cut, joins the show to talk about how AI is changing love and dating. Donald Iain Smith; Usman Kawazoe hide caption

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Donald Iain Smith; Usman Kawazoe

The surprising case for AI boyfriends

The AI revolution has come for our love lives. Millions around the world are now in relationships with chatbots who can text, sext and – for a fee – talk to you on the phone and have 'in-person' interactions via augmented reality. Host Brittany Luse tries the AI companion app Replika for herself – and discusses the experience with The Cut's Sangeeta Singh-Kurtz, who's spent the past year covering tech and dating. They talk about the surprising market that Replika has found and whether relationships with AI chatbots will become more common. Finally, they play a new game called 'Boyfriend... or Bot?'

The surprising case for AI boyfriends

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Friday

Susan Tompor, money columnist at The Detroit Free Press, and Laci Mosley, host of the Scam Goddess podcast, join Brittany to discuss scams. youngID/Kathleen Galligan hide caption

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youngID/Kathleen Galligan

Fighting back against spams, scams and schemes

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Tuesday

Daniel Hurst Photography, Tetra Images, Frazer Harrison and Kenneth Bachor

Tuesday

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Tuesday

Leah Huebner

Keyla Monterroso Mejia embraces cringe as comedy's newest star

Keyla Monterroso Mejia is a dramedy star on the rise. She made audiences cringe with laughter in Curb Your Enthusiasm playing Maria Sofia Estrada and then passed the vibe check as the chaotic teacher's aide Ashley Garcia on Abbott Elementary. And to top it all off, she's leading the new Netflix show, Freeridge. Host Brittany Luse sits down with Keyla to talk about her comedic characters, her new leading role, and betting on yourself.

Keyla Monterroso Mejia embraces cringe as comedy's newest star

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Friday

Kyle Mazza/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images; Maskot/Getty Images

Fear, Florida, and The 1619 Project

How should U.S history be told, and who gets to tell it? Debate over these questions has raged for years – but nowhere is it more pronounced right now than in Florida. This week, Brittany Luse chats with NPR's Giulia Heyward to get the download on Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis' recent efforts to ban AP African American studies in his state. Then, Brittany sits down with Dorothy Roberts, a legal scholar and sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and Leslie Alexander, a historian at Rutgers University. In line with their work on The 1619 Project – now a Hulu documentary series –they make the case that slavery led to some of our biggest political fissures today, and discuss why it's important for all Americans to understand those connections.

Fear, Florida, and The 1619 Project

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Friday

Kelela Joseph Okpako/Getty Images; Kyle Gustafson / For The Washington Post via Getty Images; Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images; Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Okpako/Getty Images; Kyle Gustafson / For The Washington Post via Getty Images; Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images; Rich Fury/Getty Images

Kelela's guide for breaking up with men

If you haven't stepped into an underground club in the last decade, you might be forgiven if you don't know Kelela. But the Washington, D.C. native has had a seismic impact on dance music since she broke into the scene in 2013. Now, after a six-year hiatus, Kelela is out with her fourth and latest record, 'Raven' – and with it, she's remaking the future of dance music. This week, host Brittany Luse sits down with Kelela to discuss Black queer liberation, and how she hopes this record helps folks find freedom on the dance floor.

Kelela's guide for breaking up with men

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Friday

Netflix; Warner Bros. Media; Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Hot and kinda bothered by 'Magic Mike'; plus Penn Badgley on bad boys

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Tuesday

Steph Chambers/Getty Images; Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images; Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Disney; Michael Reaves/Getty Images

Everything leading up to Rihanna's Halftime Show

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Friday

Raymond Boyd/Getty Images; Paul Natkin/Getty Images; Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Jazz At Lincoln Center; Noam Galai/Getty Images for Jazz At Lincoln Center

Friday

NPR

Saying goodbye to Pikachu and Ash, plus how Pokémon changed media forever

It's the end of an era. After more than 25 years, The Pokémon Company is closing the book on the adventures of Ash Ketchum and Pikachu. To celebrate the cultural impact of this dynamic duo – and of the Pokémon franchise – Brittany Luse sits down with actor Sarah Natochenny, who's voiced Ash since 2006. Sarah talks about growing up with a character who stays 10 years old, and how fans have been the lifeblood of the show. Then, Brittany sits down with Dexter Thomas, VICE News correspondent and Japanese culture critic, and Daniel Dockery, author of Monster Kids: How Pokémon Taught a Generation to Catch Them All. They explore how Pokémon transformed gaming and children's TV in the U.S. and became one of the biggest media franchises in the world.

Saying goodbye to Pikachu and Ash, plus how Pokémon changed media forever

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Tuesday

Allyson Riggs/A24

Oscar nominee Stephanie Hsu is everywhere, all at once

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Friday

Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images, Karla Ortiz, Tuck Woodstock

One of Grindr's favorite podcasts; plus, art versus AI

It's in our homes and in our pockets, and now artificial intelligence is in our art. The runaway rise of AI generator apps has sparked hot debate around the technology's impact on creative industries. Brittany Luse talks to Karla Ortiz, an artist who's part of a new lawsuit against a group of companies that use AI to generate images. Ortiz gives her take on why it's important to regulate this technology, and why everyone – not just artists – has a stake in the issue. Then, Brittany talks to Tuck Woodstock, host of the 'Gender Reveal' podcast, about the show's five-year mark and how we can all talk about gender in more informed ways.

One of Grindr's favorite podcasts; plus, art versus AI

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Friday

Mike Harrington/Getty Images; Hulu; Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; Gilbert Flores/Variety via Getty Images

Curls and courage with Michaela Angela Davis and Rep. Cori Bush

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Friday

Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images; Giorgio Viera/AFP via Getty Images; Craig Barritt/Getty Images for The Meteor; Eric Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rep. Maxwell Frost on Gen-Z politics and the price tag of power

It's a new year, and with it comes a new Congress. This week, Brittany Luse sits down with the first Gen Z member to be raised to its ranks, Democratic Rep. Maxwell Frost of Florida. They talk about his vision for the future, the literal costs of entering the halls of power and getting a shoutout from his favorite band after winning his election. Then, what could Congress do better in 2023? NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis gives Brittany her thoughts on new year's resolutions for lawmakers from both sides of the aisle.

Rep. Maxwell Frost on Gen-Z politics and the price tag of power

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Tuesday

Allyson Riggs/A24; Disney; Pixar; Daniel McFadden/Marvel Studios/Allyson Riggs/A24; Disney; Pixar; Daniel McFadden/Marvel Studios; Grace Widyatmadja/NPR

Friday

Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Tory Lanez is guilty, so why was Megan Thee Stallion's strength on trial?

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Tuesday

Caia Image/Getty Images; franckreporter/Getty Images; Maximum Film/Alamy Stock Photo; Jan Hakan Dahlstrom/Getty Images

'Love Actually' in 2022 – and the anatomy of a Christmas movie

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Friday

George Chinsee/WWD/Penske Media via Getty Images; David Glen/EyeEm/Getty Images; Dougal Waters/Getty Images; Penguin Books

Dark academia's deadly allure and the timeless appeal of prep style

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Friday

NPR

'Framing Agnes' questions the ways trans stories are told

When the world never stops questioning you, do you refuse to answer... or do you play along to get what you want? These questions are at the heart of Framing Agnes, an award-winning documentary about the legacy of a young trans woman in the 1950s who was forced to choose between access and honesty. The film uses the format of a talk show to re-enact interviews with the eponymous Agnes and five other trans people – taken from case files from a decades-old gender identity clinic at UCLA. Brittany Luse chats with the film's director, Chase Joynt, and historian Jules Gill-Peterson about the ways our society tells trans stories. They also dive into the limits of representation, the power dynamics of interviews and the nature of truth itself.

'Framing Agnes' questions the ways trans stories are told

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Tuesday

The iconic looks that rapper Lil' Kim pioneered in the 1990s helped usher in the fusion of high fashion and hip-hop. Pool SIMON/STEVENS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images; Ron Galella/Getty Images; Anthony Harvey/PA Images via Getty Images; Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images; Photo Illustration by Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Pool SIMON/STEVENS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images; Ron Galella/Getty Images; Anthony Harvey/PA Images via Getty Images; Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images; Photo Illustration by Kaz Fantone/NPR