Noam Levey
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Noam Levey

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Friday

McAlester Regional Health Center's administrative offices in McAlester, Oklahoma. Mitchell Black for KFF Health News hide caption

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Mitchell Black for KFF Health News

Thursday

Kayce Atencio, who has been shadowed by medical debt for most of his adult life, had been unable to rent an apartment because of poor credit due to medical debt, he said. Recent reporting changes by credit rating agencies have removed many debts from consumer credit reports and lifted scores for millions, a new study finds. Rachel Woolf for KFF Health News hide caption

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Rachel Woolf for KFF Health News

Thursday

Health advocates and community members gathered in Washington D.C. in mid September to push the Biden administration to take additional action on medical debt in an event hosted by nonprofit Community Catalyst. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Community Catalyst hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Community Catalyst

Medical debt could soon be barred from ruining your credit score

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Monday

Kayce Atencio, who had a heart attack when he was 19, was unable to rent an apartment for years because of bad credit attributed in part to thousands of dollars of medical debt. "It always felt like I just couldn't get a leg up," says Atencio, one of millions of Americans whose access to housing is threatened by medical debt. Rachel Woolf for KFF Health News hide caption

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Rachel Woolf for KFF Health News

Wednesday

An analysis of court records by the state treasurer and Duke researchers finds Atrium Health in Charlotte, N.C., accounted for almost a third of the legal actions against North Carolina patients over roughly five years. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

Monday

When Kristie Fields was undergoing treatment for breast cancer nine years ago, a nurse suggested she go on the local news and ask for help with her medical bills. Fields says she and her husband quickly dismissed the idea. Sonja Foster/KFF Health News hide caption

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Sonja Foster/KFF Health News

'We're not doing that': A Black couple won't crowdfund to pay medical debt

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Thursday

Doctors' offices often offer special medical credit cards as a solution to paying off large medical bills. But patients may end up paying far more for their bills when they have to pay interest down the road. Fly View Productions/Getty Images hide caption

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Fly View Productions/Getty Images

Tuesday

Marcus and Allyson Ward were paying off a debt dating back to the birth of their twins, Theo and Milo. They are among 100 million Americans with medical debt, according to a KHN/NPR investigation. Taylor Glascock for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Taylor Glascock for KHN and NPR

Wednesday

An investigation of more than 500 U.S. hospitals show that many use aggressive practices to collect on unpaid medical bills. More than two-thirds have policies that allow them to sue patients or take other legal actions against them, such as garnishing wages.This includes high-profile medical centers such as the Mayo Clinic. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday

Dr. Eckart Rolshoven examines a patient at his clinic in Püttlingen, a small town in Germany's Saarland region. Although Germany has a largely private health care system, patients pay nothing out-of-pocket when they come to see him. Pasquale D'Angiolillo for KHN hide caption

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Pasquale D'Angiolillo for KHN

Lessons from Germany to help solve the U.S. medical debt crisis

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Thursday

Many hospitals are now partnering with financing companies to offer payment plans when patients and their families can't afford their bills. The catch: the plans can come with interest that significantly increases a patient's debt. sesame/Getty Images hide caption

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sesame/Getty Images

Thursday

Diagnosed with cancer five years ago, Monica Reed of Knoxville, Tennessee, was left with nearly $10,000 in medical bills she couldn't pay. Medical debt is more prevalent among the Black community in Knoxville, than among whites. Jamar Coach for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Jamar Coach for KHN and NPR

Why Black Americans are more likely to be saddled with medical debt

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Wednesday

Aerial view of downtown Fort Worth, Texas. Some hospitals in Texas and around the U.S. are seeing high profits, even as their bills force patients into debt. Of the nation's 20 most populous counties, none has a higher concentration of medical debt than Tarrant County, home to Fort Worth. Jupiterimages/Getty Images hide caption

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Jupiterimages/Getty Images

Thursday

Lucille Brooks, a retiree who lives in Pittsford, New York, was sued in 2020 for nearly $8,000 by a nursing home that had taken care of her brother. The nursing home dropped the case after she showed she had no control over his money or authority to make decisions for him. Heather Ainsworth for KHN hide caption

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Heather Ainsworth for KHN

Nursing homes are suing friends and family to collect on patients' bills

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Saturday

Jeni Rae Peters and daughter embrace at their home in Rapid City, S.D. In 2020, Peters was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. After treatment, Peters estimates that her medical bills exceeded $30,000. Dawnee LeBeau for NPR hide caption

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Dawnee LeBeau for NPR

She was already battling cancer. Then she had to fight the bill collectors

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Wednesday

Tens of millions of Americans are making painful sacrifices due to health care debt

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Thursday

Juweek Adolphe/KHN and NPR

Sick and struggling to pay, 100 million people in the U.S. live with medical debt

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Some lost their homes. Some emptied their retirement accounts. Some struggled to feed and clothe their families. Medical debt now touches more than 100 million people in America, as the U.S. health care system pushes patients into debt on a mass scale. Jamar Coach; Eamon Queeney; Laura Buckman for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Jamar Coach; Eamon Queeney; Laura Buckman for KHN and NPR

Saturday

Dr. Mai Pham is an internist and former senior Medicare and Medicaid official with degrees from Harvard and Johns Hopkins universities, but she still struggled to find care for her son with autism, Alex Roodman. Alyssa Schukar for KHN hide caption

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Alyssa Schukar for KHN

Kids with autism struggle to adapt to adulthood. One doctor is trying to change that

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Monday

Dhaval Bhatt plays Monopoly with his children, Hridaya (left) and Martand, at their home in St. Peters, Missouri. Martand's mother took him to a children's hospital in April after he burned his hand, and the bill for the emergency room visit was more than $1,000 — even though the child was never seen by a doctor. Whitney Curtis for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for Kaiser Health News

The doctor didn't show up, but the hospital ER still billed $1,012

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Wednesday

Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, leads some of the Biden administration's efforts to expand Medicaid access. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag