Chiara Eisner Chiara Eisner is a reporter for NPR's investigations team.
Chiara Eisner
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Chiara Eisner

Joshua Boucher/Courtesy of Chiara Eisner
Chiara Eisner
Joshua Boucher/Courtesy of Chiara Eisner

Chiara Eisner

Reporter, Investigations

Chiara Eisner is a reporter for NPR's Investigations team. Eisner came to NPR from The State in South Carolina, where her investigative reporting on the experiences of former execution workers received McClatchy's President's Award and her coverage of the biomedical horseshoe crab industry led to significant restrictions of the harvest.

She previously covered criminal justice for The Marshall Project, science for The Economist and, as a freelancer, reported on everything from an unscrupulous dietary health supplement company to the plot to murder a Central American environmental activist for a host of publications like WIRED, The Intercept and Scientific American.

Before working as a reporter, Eisner co-founded a global health nonprofit, worked for an architectural design company in Boston, taught English to adult immigrants and (briefly) researched neglected tropical diseases in Brazil. She has a bachelor's of science degree in public health and a master's of science degree in journalism.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Thursday

Left: A photo provided by Alabama Department of Corrections shows inmate Kenneth Eugene Smith, who was convicted in a 1988 murder-for-hire slaying of a preacher's wife. Right: Alabama's lethal injection chamber at Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore, Ala., seen in 2002. Alabama Department of Corrections via AP and AP hide caption

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Alabama Department of Corrections via AP and AP

Alabama executes man by nitrogen gas for the first time in the U.S.

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Alabama is set to become the first state to execute an inmate using nitrogen gas

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Monday

Alabama will attempt the nation's first execution by nitrogen this week

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Wednesday

The Alabama Department of Corrections plans to execute Kenneth Smith on Jan. 25 using nitrogen gas. It will be the first time the gas has been used as an execution method in the U.S. AP/Mark Harris for NPR hide caption

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AP/Mark Harris for NPR

Kenneth Smith could be the first person executed with nitrogen gas. He spoke with NPR

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Monday

Alabama convicted killer waits to be executed this month by nitrogen gas

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Wednesday

The Virginia Department of Corrections recorded the execution of Travis Spencer's brother. Spencer wants his tape published to hold the state accountable. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Families of executed prisoners want death penalty tapes made public

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Tuesday

This undated photo provided by Alabama Department of Corrections shows inmate Kenneth Eugene Smith, who was convicted in a 1988 murder-for-hire slaying of a preacher's wife. Alabama plans to put him to death by nitrogen hypoxia, an execution method that is authorized in three states but has never been used. Alabama Department of Corrections via AP hide caption

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Alabama Department of Corrections via AP

Alabama's upcoming gas execution could harm witnesses and violate religious liberty

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Thursday

Rice's whales are one of the most recently discovered whale species in the world — and already one of the most endangered. But protections for the Gulf of Mexico species have been repeatedly delayed. KL Murphy for NPR hide caption

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KL Murphy for NPR

Only 51 of these U.S. whales remain. Little has been done to prevent their extinction

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Saturday

Horseshoe crabs are bled alive at a facility in Charleston, S.C., in June 2014. Ariane Müller hide caption

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Ariane Müller

Vaccines are still tested with horseshoe crab blood. The industry is finally changing

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Wednesday

A dead horseshoe crab lies upside down on the beach in Assateague Island, Md. Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

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Meg Anderson/NPR

The U.S. horseshoe crab blood harvest is growing. Where's the accountability?

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Saturday

Horseshoe crabs are bled at a facility in Charleston, S.C., in June 2014. Ariane Müller hide caption

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Ariane Müller

Coastal biomedical labs are bleeding more horseshoe crabs with little accountability

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Thursday

A former Virginia Department of Corrections employee donated hundreds of execution documents, including these photographs, to the Library of Virginia more than a decade ago. NPR is now exclusively publishing a selection of the documents. Library of Virginia, Chiara Eisner and Monika Evstatieva/NPR hide caption

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Library of Virginia, Chiara Eisner and Monika Evstatieva/NPR

Virginia hid execution files from the public. Here's what they don't want you to see

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Friday

Portions of a Norfolk Southern freight train that derailed in East Palestine, Ohio on Feb. 3 remained on fire the next day. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

When train crashes leak harmful chemicals, small town firefighters can be vulnerable

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Thursday

Wilbert Lee Evans (left) and Alton Waye were executed in 1990 and 1989. NPR obtained tapes that recorded their deaths. You can hear them below. Library of Virginia hide caption

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Library of Virginia

NPR uncovered secret execution tapes from Virginia. More remain hidden

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Wednesday

Clockwise from upper left: Holly Sox, Catarino Escobar, Frank Thompson, Bill Breeden, Craig Baxley and Ron McAndrew have all been affected by work related to executions. Sean Rayford, Emily Najera, Celeste Noche, Scott Langley and Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

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Sean Rayford, Emily Najera, Celeste Noche, Scott Langley and Octavio Jones for NPR

Carrying out executions took a secret toll on workers — then changed their politics

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Tuesday