Chiara Eisner Chiara Eisner is a reporter for NPR's investigations team.
Chiara Eisner
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Chiara Eisner

Joshua Boucher/Courtesy of Chiara Eisner
Chiara Eisner
Joshua Boucher/Courtesy of Chiara Eisner

Chiara Eisner

Reporter, Investigations

Chiara Eisner is a reporter for NPR's investigations team. Eisner came to NPR from The State in South Carolina, where her investigative reporting on the experiences of former execution workers received McClatchy's President's Award and her coverage of the biomedical horseshoe crab industry led to significant restrictions of the harvest.

She previously covered criminal justice for The Marshall Project, science for The Economist and, as a freelancer, reported on everything from an unscrupulous dietary health supplement company to the plot to murder a Central American environmental activist for a host of publications.

Before working as a reporter, Eisner researched neglected tropical diseases in Brazil, worked for an architectural design company in Boston, co-founded a global health nonprofit and taught English to adult immigrants. She has a bachelor's of science degree in public health and a master's of science degree in journalism.

Story Archive

Clockwise from upper left: Holly Sox, Catarino Escobar, Frank Thompson, Bill Breeden, Craig Baxley and Ron McAndrew have all been affected by work related to executions. Sean Rayford, Emily Najera, Celeste Noche, Scott Langley and Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

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Sean Rayford, Emily Najera, Celeste Noche, Scott Langley and Octavio Jones for NPR

Carrying out executions took a secret toll on workers — then changed their politics

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