Allison Mollenkamp Allison Mollenkamp is a fellow with NPR's Investigations Unit.
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Allison Mollenkamp

Courtesy of Allison Mollenkamp
Allison Mollenkamp headshot
Courtesy of Allison Mollenkamp

Allison Mollenkamp

Fellow, Investigations

Allison Mollenkamp (she/her) is a fellow with NPR's Investigations Unit, where she's worked to cover election denial and the fallout from the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol. You may have previously heard her on Nebraska Public Radio, where she led national Murrow Award-winning coverage of the state's 2019 floods. Mollenkamp holds a master's in journalism from the University of Maryland and a bachelor of arts in English from the University of Alabama.

Story Archive

NPR used social media and news reports to track four key men spreading misinformation about the 2020 election (from left to right): MyPillow CEO and longtime Trump supporter Mike Lindell, former high school math and science teacher Douglas Frank, former law professor David Clements, and former U.S. Army Captain Seth Keshel. Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters

Map: NPR tracked four key influencers who appeared at least 308 events in 45 states and the District of Columbia, often with elected officials, candidates, and grassroots organizations. Nick McMillan/NPR hide caption

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Nick McMillan/NPR

Election deniers have taken their fraud theories on tour — to nearly every state

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Couy Griffin, a commissioner in Otero County, N.M., speaks to journalists as he leaves the federal court in Washington, D.C., on March 21, 2022. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

A man using a wheelchair hands his ID to an officer at a security screening checkpoint at Orlando International Airport in 2020. Paul Henness/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Henness/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Despite calls to improve, air travel is still a nightmare for many with disabilities

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Nebraska Program Trains Court Interpreters To Help Non-English Speakers Testify

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The Midwest's Record Wet Spring Is Interfering With The Corn De-Tasseling Job Market

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Floods That Hit The Midwest In March Continue To Affect The Farm Economy

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