Julian Hayda
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Julian Hayda

Julian Hayda

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Yaroslav Holovatenko (left) and a friend with their McDonald's meals in Kyiv on Wednesday. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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Ashley Westerman/NPR

McDonald's reopens in Ukraine, feeding customers' nostalgia — and future hopes

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The reopening of McDonald's in Ukraine is serving up a reminder of life before war

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At Ukraine's Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, officials try to prevent a meltdown

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A funeral procession in Lviv, Ukraine, in March ends at grave sites where soldiers Viktor Dudar, 44, and Ivan Koverznev, 24, will be buried, as priests say their blessings and mourners look on. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Ukrainians visit an avenue, where destroyed Russian military vehicles have been displayed in Kyiv, Ukraine. Andrew Kravchenko/AP hide caption

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Andrew Kravchenko/AP

Kyiv hosts a different kind of parade to celebrate Ukraine's independence day

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Investigators work at the site of a car explosion that killed Daria Dugina outside Moscow. She was the daughter of a key Putin ally. Investigative Committee of Russia via AP hide caption

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Investigative Committee of Russia via AP

The daughter of 'Putin's brain' ideologist was killed in a car explosion

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Smoke rises after explosions were heard from the direction of a Russian military airbase near Novofedorivka, Crimea, in this still image obtained by Reuters Tuesday. Obtained by Reuters/via Reuters hide caption

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Obtained by Reuters/via Reuters

A Russian serviceman patrols Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station on May 1. A series of exchanges in recent weeks has made conditions at the plant more dangerous. Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images

Experts widely condemn Amnesty International report alleging Ukrainian war crimes

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Senior Crisis Advisor of Amnesty International Donatella Rovera (center) released a report August 4, 2022 condemning the Ukrainian army for putting civilians at risk, a possible war crime. Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Ukraine condemns Amnesty International report that troops were too close to civilians

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Bridget Brink, the new U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, speaks at a press conference on June 2 after presenting her credentials to Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in a ceremony at St. Sophia's Cathedral in Kyiv The U.S. Embassy shut down shortly before Russia invaded Ukraine in February and reopened a month ago. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

U.S. ambassador to Ukraine: 'It's going to be a long, grinding, tough war'

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Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi (left), German Chancellor Olaf Scholz (second left), Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (center), French President Emmanuel Macron (second right), and Romanian President Klaus Iohannis meet at the Ukrainian presidential compound Thursday in a collective show of European support for Ukraine in its war against Russia. Ludovic Marin/AP hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AP

Herman Makarenko, lead conductor for the National Opera of Ukraine. Julian Hayda/NPR hide caption

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Julian Hayda/NPR

Kyiv opera house reopens after 3 months

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The devastation on Bucha's Vokzal'na Street in early April, just after the Russian troops left. The photo below shows the cleaned up street on Monday. Dmytro Larin / Ukrainska Pravda hide caption

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Dmytro Larin / Ukrainska Pravda