Max Barnhart Max Barnhart is the 2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow at NPR.
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Max Barnhart

Max Barnhart headshot
Courtesy of Max Barnhart

Max Barnhart

2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow

Max Barnhart is the 2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow at NPR. He is a 5th year Ph.D. candidate and science journalist studying the evolution of heat stress resistance in sunflowers at the University of Georgia.

He was co-editor-in-chief for the Athens Science Observer, a graduate student-run science blog aimed at writing science for the general public, from 2020-2022. Barnhart is also the Head of Science Communication for the American Society of Plant Biologist's Early Career Plant Scientists Section and was awarded an educational grant to produce science zines for the community of Athens, Ga. These zines have included discussions on Diversity in the Sciences and the Plant Life of Athens.

Barnhart is originally from Buffalo, N.Y., and received his B.S. and M.S. in Biological Sciences from SUNY University at Buffalo. In his free time, Barnhart practices martial arts (he's a 2nd Degree Black Belt in Taekwondo), obsessively follows Buffalo sports and spends time with his two cats, Benny and Mochi.

Story Archive

Vision divine du 11 Mars 1948, is a series of eight drawings by Ivoirian artist Frédéric Bruly Bouabré. They depict a vision that Bouabré said he experienced that year: "seven colored suns" creating a "circle of beauty around their 'mother-sun.' " This piece and other works from Bouabré are part of an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art. The Museum of Modern Art hide caption

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The Museum of Modern Art

A screenshot of a map showing case counts of COVID-19 reported in different animal species, part of an interactive COVID data tracking dashboard rendered by Complexity Science Hub Vienna. The drawings represent the type of animal, including both domestic and wild; the size of the bubbles reflects the number of cases in each locale. Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR

Scanning electron micrograph of Salmonella typhi, the parasite that causes typhoid fever (in yellow-green, attached to another bacterial cell. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

From left to right: Alice Paredes, Sriya Chippalthurty, Liliana Talino and Natalia Perez Morales are Girl Up "teen advisers" who give up their hobbies to help disadvantaged girls and women in their communities. Girl Up hide caption

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Girl Up

A woodcut from the 15th century depicts a scene from the Black Death plague, which killed an estimated 50 million people in Europe and the Mediterranean between 1346 and 1353. Scientists say they may have found the origin of this deadly disease. Pictures from History/Universal Images Group /Getty Images hide caption

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Pictures from History/Universal Images Group /Getty Images