Max Barnhart Max Barnhart is the 2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow at NPR.
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Max Barnhart

Max Barnhart headshot
Courtesy of Max Barnhart

Max Barnhart

2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow

Max Barnhart is the 2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow at NPR. He is a 5th year Ph.D. candidate and science journalist studying the evolution of heat stress resistance in sunflowers at the University of Georgia.

He was co-editor-in-chief for the Athens Science Observer, a graduate student-run science blog aimed at writing science for the general public, from 2020-2022. Barnhart is also the Head of Science Communication for the American Society of Plant Biologist's Early Career Plant Scientists Section and was awarded an educational grant to produce science zines for the community of Athens, Ga. These zines have included discussions on Diversity in the Sciences and the Plant Life of Athens.

Barnhart is originally from Buffalo, N.Y., and received his B.S. and M.S. in Biological Sciences from SUNY University at Buffalo. In his free time, Barnhart practices martial arts (he's a 2nd Degree Black Belt in Taekwondo), obsessively follows Buffalo sports and spends time with his two cats, Benny and Mochi.

Story Archive

Monday

Ndidi Nwuneli speaks at the 2022 Goalkeepers Global Goals Awards, hosted by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in New York City. The event recognizes the work of those who help advance the U.N.'s Sustainable Development Goals in their communities and around the world. Mike Lawrence/Getty Images for Gates Archive hide caption

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Mike Lawrence/Getty Images for Gates Archive

Monday

Three TikTok phenomena of 2022: the pop star Bad Bunny; an Inuit mother and daughter who teach how to say yes with your eyebrows; and one of the Iranians who cut their hair in solidarity with 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, who died in custody after being detained by Iran's morality police for allegedly wearing her hijab inappropriately. tiktok.com/Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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tiktok.com/Screenshots by NPR

Friday

Alexis Mukwedi tested positive for sleeping sickness during a two-day mobile screening in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He had complained about nervous tics and fatigue. Xavier Vaheed-DNDi hide caption

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Xavier Vaheed-DNDi

Sunday

Bonny Omara (left) works with Edgar Mujuni at Japan's Kyushu Institute of Technology on the satellite that will be used to observe land conditions in Uganda. Bonny Omara hide caption

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Bonny Omara

Thursday

A medical worker gestures to an Ebola patient inside an isolation center in the village of Madudu, Uganda. The country is taking several public health measures to try to stem the outbreak. Hajarah Nalwadda/AP hide caption

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Hajarah Nalwadda/AP

Wednesday

Aspergillus fumigatus can infect the lungs, causing pneumonia-like symptoms that can progress into more severe sickness. BSIP/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Thursday

Priti Krishtel, a 2022 MacArthur fellowship winner, says of her work to create fair drug prices for the world: "I just don't think that people's ability to heal should depend on their ability to pay." Her father worked in the pharmaceutical industry and inspired in her a love of science and finding cures. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

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John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Tuesday

Friday

Bupe Sinkala of Zambia was diagnosed with HIV shortly before her wedding, didn't tell her fiance — and later saw her life come tumbling down. With the support of family and a new job as a community health worker, she has found joy. She shared her views on the import of community health work at the U.N. General Assembly this week. Laylah Amatullah Barrayn for NPR hide caption

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Laylah Amatullah Barrayn for NPR

Wednesday

Sean Murphy, lead author of a new malaria vaccine study, demonstrates how participants got their dose: by placing an arm over a mesh-covered container filled with 200 mosquitoes whose bites delivered genetically modified malaria parasites. Annette M Seilie hide caption

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Annette M Seilie

Friday

Monday

Angélique Kidjo performs at the 1,000th NPR's Tiny Desk Concert. She sings the praises of the series: "The Tiny Desk Concerts bring the whole world into this tiny place where you can make miracles and wonder." Bob Boilen/NPR hide caption

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Bob Boilen/NPR

Saturday

Friday