Max Barnhart Max Barnhart is the 2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow at NPR.
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Max Barnhart

Max Barnhart headshot
Courtesy of Max Barnhart

Max Barnhart

2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow

Max Barnhart is the 2022 AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow at NPR. He is a 5th year Ph.D. candidate and science journalist studying the evolution of heat stress resistance in sunflowers at the University of Georgia.

He was co-editor-in-chief for the Athens Science Observer, a graduate student-run science blog aimed at writing science for the general public, from 2020-2022. Barnhart is also the Head of Science Communication for the American Society of Plant Biologist's Early Career Plant Scientists Section and was awarded an educational grant to produce science zines for the community of Athens, Ga. These zines have included discussions on Diversity in the Sciences and the Plant Life of Athens.

Barnhart is originally from Buffalo, N.Y., and received his B.S. and M.S. in Biological Sciences from SUNY University at Buffalo. In his free time, Barnhart practices martial arts (he's a 2nd Degree Black Belt in Taekwondo), obsessively follows Buffalo sports and spends time with his two cats, Benny and Mochi.

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Bonny Omara (left) works with Edgar Mujuni at Japan's Kyushu Institute of Technology on the satellite that will be used to observe land conditions in Uganda. Bonny Omara hide caption

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Bonny Omara

A medical worker gestures to an Ebola patient inside an isolation center in the village of Madudu, Uganda. The country is taking several public health measures to try to stem the outbreak. Hajarah Nalwadda/AP hide caption

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Hajarah Nalwadda/AP

Aspergillus fumigatus can infect the lungs, causing pneumonia-like symptoms that can progress into more severe sickness. BSIP/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Priti Krishtel, a 2022 MacArthur fellowship winner, says of her work to create fair drug prices for the world: "I just don't think that people's ability to heal should depend on their ability to pay." Her father worked in the pharmaceutical industry and inspired in her a love of science and finding cures. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

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John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Bupe Sinkala of Zambia was diagnosed with HIV shortly before her wedding, didn't tell her fiance — and later saw her life come tumbling down. With the support of family and a new job as a community health worker, she has found joy. She shared her views on the import of community health work at the U.N. General Assembly this week. Laylah Amatullah Barrayn for NPR hide caption

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Laylah Amatullah Barrayn for NPR

Sean Murphy, lead author of a new malaria vaccine study, demonstrates how participants got their dose: by placing an arm over a mesh-covered container filled with 200 mosquitoes whose bites delivered genetically modified malaria parasites. Annette M Seilie hide caption

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Annette M Seilie

Angélique Kidjo performs at the 1,000th NPR's Tiny Desk Concert. She sings the praises of the series: "The Tiny Desk Concerts bring the whole world into this tiny place where you can make miracles and wonder." Bob Boilen/NPR hide caption

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Bob Boilen/NPR

The FDA says one home test is not enough if you've been exposed to someone with COVID or are experiencing COVID-like symptoms. That initial negative ... could turn positive a day or two later. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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Max Posner/NPR

Vision divine du 11 Mars 1948, is a series of eight drawings by Ivoirian artist Frédéric Bruly Bouabré. They depict a vision that Bouabré said he experienced that year: "seven colored suns" creating a "circle of beauty around their 'mother-sun.' " This piece and other works from Bouabré are part of an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art. The Museum of Modern Art hide caption

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The Museum of Modern Art

A screenshot of a map showing case counts of COVID-19 reported in different animal species, part of an interactive COVID data tracking dashboard rendered by Complexity Science Hub Vienna. The drawings represent the type of animal, including both domestic and wild; the size of the bubbles reflects the number of cases in each locale. Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR

Scanning electron micrograph of Salmonella typhi, the parasite that causes typhoid fever (in yellow-green, attached to another bacterial cell. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source