Gabriel Spitzer Gabriel Spitzer is Senior Editor of Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast.
Gabriel Spitzer, photographed for NPR, 6 June 2022, in Washington DC. Photo by Farrah Skeiky for NPR.
Stories By

Gabriel Spitzer

Farrah Skeiky/NPR
Gabriel Spitzer, photographed for NPR, 6 June 2022, in Washington DC. Photo by Farrah Skeiky for NPR.
Farrah Skeiky/NPR

Gabriel Spitzer

Senior Editor, Short Wave

Gabriel Spitzer (he/him) is Senior Editor of Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast. He comes to NPR following years of experience at Member stations – most recently at KNKX in Seattle, where he covered science and health and then co-founded and hosted the weekly show Sound Effect. That show told character-driven stories of the region's people. When the Pacific Northwest became the first place in the U.S. hit by COVID-19, the show switched gears and relaunched as Transmission, one of the country's first podcasts about the pandemic.

Spitzer spent six years at WBEZ, where he covered health and science and created the science podcast Clever Apes. Spitzer's public radio career started in Anchorage, with the Alaska Public Radio Network.

He spent a year on a John S. Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford. Spitzer has been honored with awards including the Kavli Science Journalism Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as awards from the Association of Health Care Journalists and Public Media Journalists Association.

Spitzer lives in Seattle with his wife, two children and several unruly pets.

Story Archive

Eric Minikel and Sonia Vallabh pivoted from careers in law and urban planning to lead a prion research lab at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. Maria Nemchuk/Broad Institute hide caption

toggle caption
Maria Nemchuk/Broad Institute

Sonia Vallabh and Eric Minikel at their wedding in 2009. Zamana Photography/Courtesy of Eric Minikel hide caption

toggle caption
Zamana Photography/Courtesy of Eric Minikel

Science Couldn't Save Her, So She Became A Scientist

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1136662205/1137458967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Human prion protein, molecular model. Laguna Design/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

toggle caption
Laguna Design/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

There have been a few long term studies of the box turtle that looked at box turtle populations over several decades. The studies showed big population declines—75 percent or more. Nell Greenfieldboyce/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nell Greenfieldboyce/NPR

100 Years Of Box Turtles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1131981766/1132134058" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
CSA Images/Getty Images/Vetta

The landslide in Sitka, Alaska on August 18th, 2015 happened after a morning of heavy rainfall. A three-hour rain fall total was an important data point to aid scientists in developing an early warning system. Jacyn Schmidt hide caption

toggle caption
Jacyn Schmidt

Predicting Landslides: After Disaster, Alaska Town Turns To Science

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124807416/1126359144" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Families gather in a playground with a splash pad and swings in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. Philadelphia has multiple projects underway to make this and other large parks in the city more resilient to heat and other effects of climate change. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

A late Triassic-era rausuchian, one of the rival reptile lineages who lost out to the dinosaurs. Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons

The Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, as seen from across the Dneiper River. Rehman/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Rehman/Wikimedia Commons

Big Bend National Park is home to a range of habitats: desert, mountains and river. The Chisos Mountains are at the heart of the park. At their heights, cooler forest ecosystems with pinyon pines, junipers and the endangered Guadalupe fescue emerge. Carolyn Whiting hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Whiting

UK scientists discover that bright lights in crab pots make scallops flock through the door like it's Studio 54. Maria Valladares/NOAA/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Maria Valladares/NOAA/Flickr

Darshan Chudasama, a graduate student in the Bhamla Lab at Georgia Tech, emerges from Sulphur Cave in Steamboat Springs, Colo. with a vial containing toxic spring water and the worms who live in it. City of Steamboat Springs hide caption

toggle caption
City of Steamboat Springs

The crater at Haleakalā National Park has been nicknamed the "quietest place on Earth." Nick McMahan/Quiet Parks International hide caption

toggle caption
Nick McMahan/Quiet Parks International