James Perkins Mastromarino James Perkins Mastromarino is Here & Now's DC-based producer.
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James Perkins Mastromarino

WBUR
James Perkins Mastromarino headshot
WBUR

James Perkins Mastromarino

Producer, Here & Now

James Perkins Mastromarino is Here & Now's Washington, D.C.-based producer. He works with NPR's newsroom on a daily whirlwind of topics that range from Congress to TV dramas to outer space. Mastromarino also edits NPR's Join the Game and reports on gaming for daily shows like All Things Considered and Morning Edition.

Mastromarino was born in Oakland, California, and was raised in the Netherlands, Boston, and San Diego. He contracted the media bug in high school when he made short documentaries and features that premiered at venues like the LA Film Festival. He later discovered a love of audio production as a student reporter at BYU Radio.

An avid hiker and bicyclist, he earned a bachelor's in history from Brigham Young University, researched German movies at Cambridge University and did volunteer service work in Japan. He lives in Arlington, Virginia.

Story Archive

poncle; Crows Crows Crows; SNK Corporation; Normal; Thomas van den Berge; Warner Bros. Games; Finji; Square Enix; Konami Digital Entertainment; Square Enix; Spike Chunsoft; Annapurna Interactive; Sony Interactive Entertainment; Bandai Namco; Fellow Travel

Part of the reason people love video game Elden Ring is because it's so hard to play

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Victor "Sully" Sullivan (Mark Wahlberg, left) and Nathan Drake (Tom Holland) look to make their move in Uncharted. Clay Enos/Sony Pictures hide caption

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Clay Enos/Sony Pictures

A beloved video game franchise started by reverse-engineering movies. Now, it is one.

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(Clockwise) It Takes Two, Resident Evil 8: Village, Life is Strange: True Colors, Valheim and Inscryption NPR hide caption

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The top five video games of 2021 selected by the NPR staff

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