Chloe Veltman Chloe Veltman is a correspondent on NPR's Culture Desk.
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Chloe Veltman

Jim Ratcliffe
Chloe Veltman headshot
Jim Ratcliffe

Chloe Veltman

Correspondent, Culture Desk

Chloe Veltman is a correspondent on NPR's Culture Desk.

Her careening approach to her beat has led to stories about the role of hip-hop in moving along the national conversation around Reparations; a look at the soap opera 'Dynasty' as a trailblazer in the representation of LGBTQ+ characters on mainstream TV; the outsize impact of a tiny Ukraininan newspaper on the west coast in galvanizing community support around the war; and the complex relationship humans have with our ever-more-human seeming digital assistants. (Veltman even got her own voice cloned for this story.)

Before joining NPR in July 2022, Veltman worked for a couple of Member stations. She was an arts and culture reporter and senior arts editor at KQED in San Francisco, and launched and led the arts and culture bureau at Colorado Public Radio in Denver.

Veltman's foray into public media grew out of her work as an award-winning print journalist and podcaster. Before winning a John S. Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, she was the Bay Area's culture columnist for The New York Times and the founder, and host and executive producer of VoiceBox, a weekly podcast/radio show and live events series all about the human voice.

Being a voice nerd, Veltman loves to sing. She has an annoying habit of making up jingles about her cat, Mishka.

Veltman came to the U.S. as a grad student and has lived here ever since. When NPR offered her the job, she said she was "exceedingly chuffed" — (translation: "totally stoked") — proving the old adage that you can take the girl out of England but you can't take England out of the girl.

Story Archive

The Smithsonian shines a light on designer and sculptor Maya Lin

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Coco Hernandez (Irene Cara) performs at a graduation ceremony in a scene from Fame, directed by Alan Parker, 1980. United Artists/Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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United Artists/Archive Photos/Getty Images

'Fame' and 'Flashdance' singer Irene Cara has died at 63

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A photo illustration shows the reactivated Twitter profile of former US President Donald Trump. Elon Musk reinstated him on the social media platform on November 19, 2022. Stanislav Kogiku/SOPA Images/Lightrocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Stanislav Kogiku/SOPA Images/Lightrocket via Getty Images

Maya Lin, in 1988, examining inverted water table being fabricated for the Civil Rights Memorial she designed to be installed in Montgomery, Alabama. Adam Stoltman hide caption

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Adam Stoltman

Maya Lin doesn't like the spotlight — but the Smithsonian is shining a light on her

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Luke Hemsworth, Jeffrey Wright, Aaron Paul, Angela Sarafryan, Tessa Thompson, Evan Rachel Wood, Ed Harris, and James Marsden attend HBO's Westworld Season 4 premiere at Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center on June 21, 2022 in New York City. Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Climate activists have been attacking artworks recently, but how effective is this?

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Author Colleen Hoover signs her novel, "It Starts with Us." Colleen Hoover hide caption

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Colleen Hoover

Author Colleen Hoover went from tending cows to writing bestsellers

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A participant sings karaoke inside "TNT Traysikel," a mobile artwork by Paolo Asuncion and Michael Arcega, two students of Carlos Villa. The piece is part of the Villa retrospective at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Chloe Veltman/NPR/Chloe Veltman/NPR hide caption

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How one Filipino American artist influenced the work of a generation of others

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Lizzo performs on rarely-played James Madison glass flute at DC concert

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San Francisco Opera prompter Matthew Piatt sits in the prompter's box at the War Memorial Opera House. Chloe Veltman/NPR/Chloe Veltman/NPR hide caption

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The hidden world of an opera prompter

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Members of the English punk band the Sex Pistols. From left: Lead singer and songwriter John Joseph Lydon a.k.a. Johnny Rotten, drummer Paul Cook, bass guitarist John Simon Ritchie a.k.a. Sid Vicious and guitarist Steve Jones. Mirrorpix/John Mead/Mirrorpix/Getty Images hide caption

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Mirrorpix/John Mead/Mirrorpix/Getty Images

British pop music has a fraught relationship with Queen Elizabeth

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Hip-hop collective Alphabet Rockers makes music for and with kids. Alphabet Rockers/Alphabet Rockers hide caption

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Alphabet Rockers/Alphabet Rockers

It's kids who are the stars of the Grammy-nominated Alphabet Rockers

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