Chloe Veltman Chloe Veltman is a correspondent on NPR's Culture Desk.
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Chloe Veltman

Jim Ratcliffe
Chloe Veltman headshot
Jim Ratcliffe

Chloe Veltman

Correspondent, Culture Desk

Chloe Veltman is a correspondent on NPR's Culture Desk.

From her base in San Francisco where she has lived for more than 20 years, Veltman covers a wide array of cultural news and trends, with a specialty in stories at the intersection of climate change and culture, and stories about the impact of technology on the cultural landscape.

Before joining NPR in July 2022, Veltman worked for a couple of member stations. She was an arts and culture reporter and senior arts editor at KQED in San Francisco, and launched and led the arts and culture bureau at Colorado Public Radio in Denver.

Veltman's foray into public media grew out of her work as an award-winning print journalist and podcaster. Before winning a John S. Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, she was the Bay Area's culture columnist for The New York Times and the founder, and host and executive producer of VoiceBox, a weekly podcast/radio show and live events series all about the human voice.

Being a voice nerd, Veltman loves to sing. She has an annoying habit of making up jingles about her cat, Mishka.

Veltman came to the U.S. as a grad student and has lived here ever since. When NPR offered her the job, she said she was "exceedingly chuffed" — (translation: "totally stoked") — proving the old adage that you can take the girl out of England but you can't take England out of the girl.

Story Archive

Saturday

Saturday

Nemo of Switzerland, who performed the song "The Code," celebrates after winning the grand final of the Eurovision Song Contest in Malmo, Sweden, on Saturday. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

Zendaya at the 2024 Met Gala in New York City. The actress is one of many celebrities whose name has appeared this week on social media "block" lists for not speaking out publicly about the conflict in Gaza. Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

Sunday

Saturday

The Golden Saxophone House, featured on HGTV's new series Zillow Gone Wild. HGTV hide caption

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HGTV

'Zillow Gone Wild' brings wacky real estate listings to HGTV

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Tuesday

Moor Studio/Getty Images

AI is contentious among authors. So why are some feeding it their own writing?

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Sunday

Visitors observe the painting the Mona Lisa by Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci on display in a gallery at Louvre on May 19, 2021 in Paris, France. Marc Piasecki/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piasecki/Getty Images

Friday

The thriving market of crafty products inspired by Taylor Swift

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Sunday

Ask Dalí at the Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla., allows visitors talk to the famous surrealist artist via an AI-generated version of his voice. Martin Pagh Ludvigsen/Goodby Silverstein & Partners hide caption

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Martin Pagh Ludvigsen/Goodby Silverstein & Partners

Saturday

Thursday

Guitarist, singer and songwriter Dickey Betts was a founding member of the Allman Brothers Band. He's pictured on May 19, 2014, in Nashville, Tenn. Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Webster PR hide caption

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Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Webster PR

Saturday

Friday

Ethiopian singer Muluken Melesse. Muluken Melesse Family hide caption

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Muluken Melesse Family

Ethiopian singer Muluken Melesse dies at 73

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Saturday

Friday

Activists from Extinction Rebellion, left and center, protest during a performance of An Enemy of the People on Broadway, starring Jeremy Strong, right. Extinction Rebellion NYC hide caption

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Extinction Rebellion NYC

'We want to help': Why climate activists are trying something new

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Saturday

An AT&T store in New York. The telecommunications company said Saturday that a data breach has compromised the information tied to 7.6 million current customers. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Thursday

Visitors look at the artwork "The Matter of Time" by US artist Richard Serra during the presentation of the "25 Years of the Museum Collection" exhibition on the 25th anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in the Spanish Basque city of Bilbao on Oct. 18, 2022. Ander Gillenea/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ander Gillenea/AFP via Getty Images

Photos: Remembering Richard Serra, a world-renowned 'poet' of metals

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Wednesday

Looking back on the life and legacy of sculptor Richard Serra

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Sunday

What's behind the so-called 'hologram' celebrity concerts

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David Johnson in 2023 with one of his photographs, "Clarence," at an award luncheon at UC Berkeley honoring the photographer. Peg Skorpinski hide caption

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Peg Skorpinski

Photographer David Johnson, who chronicled San Francisco's Black culture, dies at 97

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Friday

Shigeichi Negishi, the Japanese entrepreneur who invented the first-ever karaoke machine, died at 100 on Jan. 26. cookelman/Getty Images hide caption

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cookelman/Getty Images

Karaoke inventor Shigeichi Negishi dies at 100

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