B.A. Parker
B.A. Parker, photographed for NPR, 9 September 2022, in New York, NY. Photo by Brandon Watson for NPR.
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B.A. Parker

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Wednesday

Despite being addictive and deadly, menthol cigarettes were long advertised as a healthy alternative to "regular" cigarettes — and heavily advertised to Black folks in cities. Jackie Lay/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Lay/NPR

Wednesday

In 1937, the Washington Afro-American featured the "Lonesome Hearts" column, where Black folks looking for love could send letters. Jackie Lay hide caption

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Jackie Lay

Friday

A mural in Laramie, Wyo., that honors the Black 14. AP/Mead Gruver/AP/Mead Gruver hide caption

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AP/Mead Gruver/AP/Mead Gruver

Wednesday

Taylor Swift, who has been celebrated for her ability to channel the emotions and perspectives of adolescent girls. Photos: Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP, Shirlaine Forrest/Getty Images for TAS/Design: Jackie Lay/NPR hide caption

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Photos: Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP, Shirlaine Forrest/Getty Images for TAS/Design: Jackie Lay/NPR

Monday

After leaving the Pentecostal Church, reporter Jess Alvarenga has been searching for a new spiritual home. Jackie Lay hide caption

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Jackie Lay

Wednesday

Fanta Kaba from WNYC's Radio Rookies (left) is also a resident of a New York City Housing Authority facility. She reports on the privatization of NYCHA buildings and what that means for residents. Carolina Hidalgo/Radio Rookies and Spencer Platt/Getty Images/NPR hide caption

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Carolina Hidalgo/Radio Rookies and Spencer Platt/Getty Images/NPR

Wednesday

Code Switch is live on stage in Little Rock, Ark. (right). They interviewed Dr. Sybil Jordan Hampton (left) about what it was like to go to school during desegregation efforts in the 1950s and 60s. Dr. Sibyl Jordan Hampton, Little Rock Public Radio hide caption

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Dr. Sibyl Jordan Hampton, Little Rock Public Radio

Wednesday

Clockwise from upper left: B.A.Parker at Somerset Place plantation as a child; Bad Bunny exalts Puerto Rico in his music of resistance; Chefs Reem Assil and Priya Krishna; Race is also a part of our taxes and who gets audited; Originally from Rwanda, Claude Gatebuke came to Nashville 30 years ago; Hank Azaria (left) and Hari Kondabolu speak since their fallout in 2017. B.A.Parker, Getty Images, NPR, Getty Images//LA Johnson/NPR, Joseph Ross for NPR, PR Agency hide caption

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B.A.Parker, Getty Images, NPR, Getty Images//LA Johnson/NPR, Joseph Ross for NPR, PR Agency

Wednesday

Author Shahnaz Habib next to the cover of her new book, Airplane Mode. Author photo by Eva Garmendia hide caption

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Author photo by Eva Garmendia

Wednesday

Left: James Spooner, co-creator of Afropunk Festival and co-editor of Black Punk Now. Right: Black Punk Now cover art. PR Agency hide caption

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PR Agency

Tuesday

Students give a presentation at a construction site in South Baltimore. The student activists, who formed the group Free Your Voice, are fighting against a very different kind of danger in their neighborhood: air pollution and climate change. B.A. Parker/NPR hide caption

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B.A. Parker/NPR

Code Switch: Baltimore teens are fighting for environmental justice — and winning

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Wednesday

Author Alejandra Oliva (right) next to the cover of her memoir, Rivermouth. Headshot by Anna Longworth hide caption

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Headshot by Anna Longworth

Wednesday

Students give a presentation at a construction site in South Baltimore. The student activists, who formed the group Free Your Voice, are fighting against a very different kind of danger in their neighborhood: air pollution and climate change. B.A. Parker/NPR hide caption

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B.A. Parker/NPR

Student activists are pushing back against big polluters — and winning

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Wednesday

Comedians Brian Bahe, Maz Jobrani and Aparna Nancherla. Brian Bahe, Storm Santos and Aparna Nancherla hide caption

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Brian Bahe, Storm Santos and Aparna Nancherla

Wednesday

Islen Milien for NPR

Wednesday

The covers of recent Code Switch summer book picks, including Hijab Butch Blues, Alma y Como Obtuvo Su Nombre, I'm Not Done With You Yet, and The Late Americans. Dial Press/Penguin Random House/Riverhead Books hide caption

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Dial Press/Penguin Random House/Riverhead Books

Wednesday

B.A.Parker at Somerset Place plantation as a child. Courtesy of B.A.Parker hide caption

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Courtesy of B.A.Parker

Wednesday

A photo of Somerset Place plantation in North Carolina. B.A. Parker/NPR hide caption

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B.A. Parker/NPR

Wednesday

Rebecca Nagle is the host of the podcast "This Land." Sean Scheidt/Sean Scheidt hide caption

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Sean Scheidt/Sean Scheidt

Wednesday

Writer Naomi Jackson Lola Flash/Naomi Jackson hide caption

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Lola Flash/Naomi Jackson

Wednesday

Psychiatrist Pooja Lakshmin next to the cover of her new book, Real Self Care (Crystals, Cleanses and Bubble Baths Not Included.) Courtesy of the publisher hide caption

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Courtesy of the publisher

Wednesday

Illustration of DreamDoll, Doechii and Baby Tate. Amanda Howell Whitehurst for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Howell Whitehurst for NPR

Wednesday

Jasmin Savoy Brown stars in Scream 6 and Yellowjackets. photo by Robb Klassen/design by NPR hide caption

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photo by Robb Klassen/design by NPR

Whose Nightmares Are We Telling? How Horror Has Evolved for People of Color

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Wednesday

Black history then, and now (left) Carter G. Woodson and his great, great grand nephew, Brett Woodson Bailey. NPR hide caption

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