Dina Temple-Raston As special correspondent, Dina Temple-Raston develops programming focused on the news of the day and issues of our time.
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Dina Temple-Raston

Dina Temple-Raston

Special Correspondent

As special correspondent, Dina Temple-Raston develops programming focused on the news of the day and issues of our time.

Previously, Temple-Raston served as NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent, reporting from all over the world. In that role, Temple-Raston covered deadly terror attacks in the U.S. and abroad, the evolution of ISIS, and radicalization. While on leave from NPR, Dina independently executive produced and hosted a non-NPR podcast about adolescent decision making called What Were You Thinking.

In 2014, she completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where, as the first Murrey Marder Nieman Fellow in Watchdog Journalism, she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence.

Prior to joining NPR in 2007, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in Asia and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case. She is a frequent contributor to the PBS Newshour, a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to The New Yorker, The Atlantic, New York Magazine, Radiolab, the TLS, and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, and she has an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Manhattanville College.

Temple-Raston was born in Belgium and her first language is French. She also speaks Mandarin and a smattering of Arabic.

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Story Archive

Solving The Challenges To Counting Forest Elephants

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How The U.S. Cracked Into One Of The Most Secretive Terrorist Organizations

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Neil stands in a room with military cyber operators from Joint Task Force ARES to launch an operation that would become one of the largest and longest offensive cyber operations in U.S. military history. Josh Kramer for NPR hide caption

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Josh Kramer for NPR

How The U.S. Hacked ISIS

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How A Classified U.S. Military Operation Hacked ISIS

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Adrian Lamo (center) walks out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., where Chelsea Manning's court-martial was held, on Dec. 20, 2011. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The Mysterious Death Of The Hacker Who Turned In Chelsea Manning

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Computer Scientists Work To Fix Easily Fooled AI

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Using AI In Malawi To Save Elephants

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Adrian Lamo enters a car after testifying in a military hearing regarding Army Pfc. Chelsea Manning's role in the WikiLeaks classified leaks case on Dec. 20, 2011, in Fort Meade, Md. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Chelsea Manning Comments Publicly On The Late Hacker Adrian Lamo

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Task Force Takes On Russian Election Interference

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An African forest elephant in Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the Republic of the Congo. Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty

Episode 932: Deep Learning With The Elephants

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Hacks Are Getting So Common That Companies Are Turning To 'Cyber Insurance'

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks during the annual F8 conference in San Jose, Calif., on May 1. California passed legislation that would allow users to sue for damages for data breaches like the one Facebook recently suffered. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Why The Tech Industry Wants Federal Control Over Data Privacy Laws

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Jihadi Rehab May Be An Alternative To Prison For Young ISIS Recruits

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