Dina Temple-Raston Dina Temple-Raston is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories and national security, technology and social justice.
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Dina Temple-Raston

Dina Temple-Raston

Correspondent, Investigations

Dina Temple-Raston is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories and national security, technology and social justice.

Previously, Temple-Raston worked in NPR's programming department to create and host I'll Be Seeing You, a four-part series of radio specials for the network that focused on the technologies that watch us. Before that, she served as NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent for more than a decade, reporting from all over the world to cover deadly terror attacks, the evolution of ISIS and radicalization. While on leave from NPR in 2018, she independently executive produced and hosted a non-NPR podcast called What Were You Thinking, which looked at what the latest neuroscience can reveal about the adolescent decision-making process.

In 2014, she completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where, as the first Murrey Marder Nieman Fellow in Watchdog Journalism, she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence.

Prior to joining NPR in 2007, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in China and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case, and A Death in Texas: A Story About Race, Murder and a Small Town's Struggle for Redemption, about the racially-motivated murder of James Byrd, Jr. in Jasper, Texas, which won the Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers prize. She is a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to The New Yorker, The Atlantic, New York Magazine, Radiolab, the TLS and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, and she has an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Manhattanville College.

Temple-Raston was born in Belgium and her first language is French. She also speaks Mandarin and a smattering of Arabic.

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Story Archive

An election worker uses an electronic pollbook to check voters at a polling station in the Echo Park Recreation Complex in Los Angeles on March 3, 2020. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Voter Websites In California And Florida Could Be Vulnerable To Hacks, Report Finds

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TeleTracking was awarded a contract to collect COVID-19 data from the nation's hospitals despite no previous experience working on this sort of data collection. And its system has been plagued by inconsistencies and errors. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

So far, few deepfakes have been used this political season. It's not because they aren't a potential threat, but because simpler deceptive tactics are still effective at spreading misinformation. amtitus/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

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amtitus/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images

Where Are The Deepfakes In This Presidential Election?

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U.S. Park Police and other federal officers hold a perimeter near the White House on June 1 as demonstrators gather to protest the killing of George Floyd. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Military police hold a line near the White House on June 1 as demonstrators gather to protest police brutality in Washington, D.C. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Police move in on demonstrators in Lafayette Square near the White House with tear gas and smoke on June 1. U.S. Park Police made announcements asking protesters to leave, but few people appeared to hear them. Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters Were Supposed To Hear Warnings Before Federal Police Moved In. They Didn't

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U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy arrives at an Aug. 5 meeting at the office of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Who Is Louis DeJoy? U.S. Postmaster General In Spotlight Ahead Of 2020 Election

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An NPR investigation has identified unusual decisions around the process that lead to a Pittsburgh company winning a contract to gather COVID-19 data instead of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. smartboy10/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

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smartboy10/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images

Irregularities In COVID Reporting Contract Award Process Raise New Questions

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How Small Tech Company Got $10.2 Million Contract To Build COVID-19 Database

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Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., has asked Trump administration officials to account for how and why they selected particular companies to provide personal protective equipment. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Police confront protesters in front of the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, NY, on May 29, 2020. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Lawyers Charged With Seven Felonies In Molotov Cocktail Attack Out On Bail

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Jeff Jonas sits at a computer, creating software that not only tracked the fish from The Mirage but allowed the casino to make better decisions about how it stocked the tank. Eventually, this system would become known as Non-Obvious Relationship Awareness — NORA. Olivia Fields for NPR hide caption

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Olivia Fields for NPR

Can A Computer Catch A Spy?

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Elephants approach a road at Liwonde. Reid says the park hasn't lost a single high-value animal in 30 months. Thoko Chikondi for NPR hide caption

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Thoko Chikondi for NPR

49-Minute Listen

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