Dina Temple-Raston Dina Temple-Raston is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories and national security, technology and social justice.
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Dina Temple-Raston

Dina Temple-Raston

Correspondent, Investigations

Dina Temple-Raston is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories and national security, technology and social justice.

Previously, Temple-Raston worked in NPR's programming department to create and host I'll Be Seeing You, a four-part series of radio specials for the network that focused on the technologies that watch us. Before that, she served as NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent for more than a decade, reporting from all over the world to cover deadly terror attacks, the evolution of ISIS and radicalization. While on leave from NPR in 2018, she independently executive produced and hosted a non-NPR podcast called What Were You Thinking, which looked at what the latest neuroscience can reveal about the adolescent decision-making process.

In 2014, she completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where, as the first Murrey Marder Nieman Fellow in Watchdog Journalism, she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence.

Prior to joining NPR in 2007, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in China and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case, and A Death in Texas: A Story About Race, Murder and a Small Town's Struggle for Redemption, about the racially-motivated murder of James Byrd, Jr. in Jasper, Texas, which won the Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers prize. She is a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to The New Yorker, The Atlantic, New York Magazine, Radiolab, the TLS and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, and she has an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Manhattanville College.

Temple-Raston was born in Belgium and her first language is French. She also speaks Mandarin and a smattering of Arabic.

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Story Archive

The SolarWinds Attack: The Story Behind The Hack

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An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

A 'Worst Nightmare' Cyberattack: The Untold Story Of The SolarWinds Hack

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The FBI has released a substantial amount of information, including surveillance video, about the unidentified bomb-maker. FBI/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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FBI/screenshot by NPR

What We Know About The Suspect Who Planted Bombs Before The Capitol Riot

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ISIS and domestic extremism in the U.S. are driven by very different ideologies, but the process by which young people are radicalized is remarkably similar. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

A Tale Of 2 Radicalizations

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Bruno Cua, 18, is allegedly seen here with his back to the camera, holding a tan jacket. Prosecutors say he entered the Senate Chamber of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 with a handful of other rioters. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A demonstrator wears an Oath Keepers anti-government organization badge on a tactical vest during a protest outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 5, 2021. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gen. Paul Nakasone, the National Security Agency director, told NPR ahead of the 2020 elections that the U.S. was "going to expand our insights of our adversaries. ... We're going to know our adversaries better than they know themselves." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Why Russia May Have Stepped Up Its Hacking Game

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When law enforcement officials failed to anticipate that pro-Trump supporters would devolve into a violent mob, they fell victim to what one expert calls "the invisible obvious." He said it was hard for authorities to see that people who looked like them could want to commit this kind of violence. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Why Didn't The FBI And DHS Produce A Threat Report Ahead of The Capitol Insurrection?

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For the 78 residents of St. Joseph's Senior Home in New Jersey, the arrival of hazmat-suited officials in March in their caravan of ambulance buses was terrifying. Some evacuees with dementia shouted and furiously clawed at them. Others begged not to be taken away. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

The Tragedy Of 'St. Joe's'

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ApiJect makes a disposable injection device that the company says can be mass-produced to deliver vaccines and medications around the world. ApiJect hide caption

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ApiJect

As Vaccine Approvals Loom, U.S. Funds A Backup Plan For Delivery

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Foreign threats to the 2020 election looked a lot like Y2K from two decades ago: With high levels of alarm and preparation, the system held off foreign disinformation and cyberattacks. Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images hide caption

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Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images

How The U.S. Fended Off Serious Foreign Election Day Cyberattacks

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The flawed coronavirus test kits went out to public laboratories in February. An internal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention review obtained by NPR says the wrong quality control protocols were used. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP

CDC Report: Officials Knew Coronavirus Test Was Flawed But Released It Anyway

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An election worker uses an electronic pollbook to check voters at a polling station in the Echo Park Recreation Complex in Los Angeles on March 3, 2020. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Voter Websites In California And Florida Could Be Vulnerable To Hacks, Report Finds

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TeleTracking was awarded a contract to collect COVID-19 data from the nation's hospitals despite no previous experience working on this sort of data collection. And its system has been plagued by inconsistencies and errors. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

So far, few deepfakes have been used this political season. It's not because they aren't a potential threat, but because simpler deceptive tactics are still effective at spreading misinformation. amtitus/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

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amtitus/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images

Where Are The Deepfakes In This Presidential Election?

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