Dina Temple-Raston Dina Temple-Raston is a correspondent on NPR's Investigations team focusing on breaking news stories and national security, technology and social justice.
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Dina Temple-Raston

Trump supporters breach security and storm inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The woman in blue with her fist raised was later identified as Suzanne Ianni. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department Is Struggling To Bring Capitol Riot Cases To Trial: Here's Why

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What We Know About The Russian Phishing Hack

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Microsoft says the same group that breached the software company SolarWinds seems to have launched another hack, this time using phishing attacks on a number of human rights agencies, including the U.S. Agency for International Development. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

What Microsoft Officials Know About Russia's Phishing Hack Targeting USAID

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Hackers used the U.S. Agency for International Development's email marketing account to send messages that looked legitimate — but links in the email exposed recipients to malicious software, Microsoft says. Screen grab by Microsoft hide caption

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Screen grab by Microsoft

The CDC's early coronavirus test was poorly designed, and it also came with problematic instructions, NPR has learned. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

A new report says a division within the Department of Homeland Security missed signs of potential violence before the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Report: DHS Division Failed To Analyze Intelligence Ahead Of Capitol Violence

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Anne Neuberger, the deputy national security adviser for cyber and emerging technology, says an upcoming executive order will strengthen U.S. cybersecurity, from setting up new ways to investigate cyberattacks to developing standards for software. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Order To Require New Cybersecurity Standards In Response To SolarWinds Attack

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The SolarWinds Attack: The Story Behind The Hack

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An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

A 'Worst Nightmare' Cyberattack: The Untold Story Of The SolarWinds Hack

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The FBI has released a substantial amount of information, including surveillance video, about the unidentified bomb-maker. FBI/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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FBI/screenshot by NPR

What We Know About The Suspect Who Planted Bombs Before The Capitol Riot

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ISIS and domestic extremism in the U.S. are driven by very different ideologies, but the process by which young people are radicalized is remarkably similar. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

A Tale Of 2 Radicalizations

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Bruno Cua, 18, is allegedly seen here with his back to the camera, holding a tan jacket. Prosecutors say he entered the Senate Chamber of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 with a handful of other rioters. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A demonstrator wears an Oath Keepers anti-government organization badge on a tactical vest during a protest outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 5, 2021. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gen. Paul Nakasone, the National Security Agency director, told NPR ahead of the 2020 elections that the U.S. was "going to expand our insights of our adversaries. ... We're going to know our adversaries better than they know themselves." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Why Russia May Have Stepped Up Its Hacking Game

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When law enforcement officials failed to anticipate that pro-Trump supporters would devolve into a violent mob, they fell victim to what one expert calls "the invisible obvious." He said it was hard for authorities to see that people who looked like them could want to commit this kind of violence. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Why Didn't The FBI And DHS Produce A Threat Report Ahead of The Capitol Insurrection?

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