Mary Yang Mary Yang is an intern on the Business Desk where she covers technology, media, labor and the economy.
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Mary Yang

Mary Yang

Intern, Business Desk

Mary Yang is an intern on the Business Desk where she covers technology, media, labor and the economy. She comes to NPR from Foreign Policy where she covered the beginning of Russia's war in Ukraine and built a beat on Southeast Asia, Asia and the Pacific Islands.

Yang previously spent time on the Hill covering affordable housing and transportation policy as a beat reporter for Medill News Service and wrote about small businesses at Inc. She was one of the first writers at The Yappie, a nonprofit newsroom on AAPI politics and policy, and she is a proud member of the Asian American Journalists Association.

Yang has a bachelor's degree in journalism from Northwestern University, where she also studied political science. She is based in Washington, D.C.

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Due to high inflation this year, NPR's Business desk shares cheaper dishes to substitute for Thanksgiving stables. Maansi Srivastava/NPR hide caption

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Maansi Srivastava/NPR

Inflation won't win Thanksgiving: Here's NPR's plan to help you save on a meal

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The departures of thousands of Twitter workers is raising fears about the stability of the influential social media site under new owner Elon Musk. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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How likely is a complete Twitter meltdown?

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Owner Elon Musk has told remaining Twitter employees that they must decide whether to stay or go by Thursday afternoon. Here, Musk, as CEO of Tesla, speaks at a conference in Norway. CARINA JOHANSEN/NTB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The Mastodon app homepage is seen displayed on a mobile phone screen. Photo Illustration by Davide Bonaldo/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Davide Bonaldo/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Some Twitter users flying the coop hope Mastodon will be a safe landing

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A car passes Facebook's new Meta logo on a sign at the company headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

Facebook parent company Meta sheds 11,000 jobs in latest sign of tech slowdown

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Tucker Bubacz, a 17-year-old senior, climbs into the cab of a semi truck just outside Williamsport High School in Williamsport, Md. on Monday, Oct. 17, 2022. Amanda Berg for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Berg for NPR

The driver of the big rig one lane over might soon be one of these teenagers

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Meta's tumble in share price on Thursday was the market's reaction to news that a slowdown in digital advertising, new security protocols on Apple devices and a bet on the metaverse have all hurt the Facebook parent's bottom line. In particular, investors have criticized Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg, seen here, for spending big on the metaverse. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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For-sale signs dot the roads at senior-only Skyline Mobile Home Park, where residents face rent increases of about $200 in Torrance, Calif. on Aug. 24. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images hide caption

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Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram via Getty Images