Jamal Michel
Stories By

Jamal Michel

Jamal Michel

Jamal Michel is a freelance writer whose work focuses on video game culture, entertainment and the stories in between them. He is currently a member of the Life Kit and It's Been a Minute teams.

Story Archive

Friday

Raymond Boyd/Getty Images; Paul Natkin/Getty Images; Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Jazz At Lincoln Center; Noam Galai/Getty Images for Jazz At Lincoln Center

Friday

NPR

Saying goodbye to Pikachu and Ash, plus how Pokémon changed media forever

It's the end of an era. After more than 25 years, The Pokémon Company is closing the book on the adventures of Ash Ketchum and Pikachu. To celebrate the cultural impact of this dynamic duo – and of the Pokémon franchise – Brittany Luse sits down with actor Sarah Natochenny, who's voiced Ash since 2006. Sarah talks about growing up with a character who stays 10 years old, and how fans have been the lifeblood of the show. Then, Brittany sits down with Dexter Thomas, VICE News correspondent and Japanese culture critic, and Daniel Dockery, author of Monster Kids: How Pokémon Taught a Generation to Catch Them All. They explore how Pokémon transformed gaming and children's TV in the U.S. and became one of the biggest media franchises in the world.

Saying goodbye to Pikachu and Ash, plus how Pokémon changed media forever

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Tuesday

Allyson Riggs/A24

Oscar nominee Stephanie Hsu is everywhere, all at once

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Friday

Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images, Karla Ortiz, Tuck Woodstock

One of Grindr's favorite podcasts; plus, art versus AI

It's in our homes and in our pockets, and now artificial intelligence is in our art. The runaway rise of AI generator apps has sparked hot debate around the technology's impact on creative industries. Brittany Luse talks to Karla Ortiz, an artist who's part of a new lawsuit against a group of companies that use AI to generate images. Ortiz gives her take on why it's important to regulate this technology, and why everyone – not just artists – has a stake in the issue. Then, Brittany talks to Tuck Woodstock, host of the 'Gender Reveal' podcast, about the show's five-year mark and how we can all talk about gender in more informed ways.

One of Grindr's favorite podcasts; plus, art versus AI

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Friday

Mike Harrington/Getty Images; Hulu; Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; Gilbert Flores/Variety via Getty Images

Curls and courage with Michaela Angela Davis and Rep. Cori Bush

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Thursday

Wednesday