Jamal Michel
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Jamal Michel

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Monday

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Sunday

Encore: A new mode in MLB video game celebrates historical Black all-stars

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Tuesday

Trina. Amanda Howell Whitehurst for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Howell Whitehurst for NPR

Friday

The third episode in season four of the HBO hit 'Succession' has the dysfunctional Roys dealing with grief and death. HBO hide caption

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HBO

Death and grief in 'Succession'; plus, privacy and the abortion pill

This week, host Brittany Luse is joined by UC Berkeley Law professor Khiara Bridges to connect the dots between the recent legal battles over the abortion pill mifepristone and our constitutional right to privacy. Then, Linda Holmes of NPR's 'Pop Culture Happy Hour' stops by to chat about the television episode that still has our group chats in a chokehold, and how it eloquently captured the way we experience death and grief in real life.

Death and grief in 'Succession'; plus, privacy and the abortion pill

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Thursday

A new mode in MLB video game celebrates historical Black all-stars

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Friday

Steven Yeun's new Netflix show, Beef, is all about rage and revenge. Irina Solomonova stars in the latest season of the reality dating show Love Is Blind. JC Olivera / Stringer ; Love Is Blind. Irina in Season 4 of Love Is Blind. Cr. Netflix © 2023 hide caption

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JC Olivera / Stringer ; Love Is Blind. Irina in Season 4 of Love Is Blind. Cr. Netflix © 2023

Serving up villains and vengeance in 'Love Is Blind' and Steven Yeun's 'Beef'

In reality TV, bringing the drama used to mean making it big. But these days, it doesn't seem to pay to be the mean girl. B.A. Parker, co-host of NPR's 'Code Switch,' joins Brittany Luse to explore the end of reality TV's villain era and the state of the influencer economy. Then, we dive into the psyche behind Academy Award-nominee Steven Yeun's latest character in Netflix's 'Beef.' He and Brittany discuss the diabolical antics of protagonist Danny and the surprising result of all that on-screen tension with his co-star Ali Wong.

Serving up villains and vengeance in 'Love Is Blind' and Steven Yeun's 'Beef'

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Friday

Susan Tompor, money columnist at The Detroit Free Press, and Laci Mosley, host of the Scam Goddess podcast, join Brittany to discuss scams. youngID/Kathleen Galligan hide caption

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youngID/Kathleen Galligan

Fighting back against spams, scams and schemes

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Thursday

Friday

Friday

Author photo courtesy of Malcolm Harris; photo illustration by Jesse Brown David Madison/Getty Images/Rebecca Noble/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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David Madison/Getty Images/Rebecca Noble/AFP via Getty Images

Silicon Valley Bank and the sordid history of 'Palo Alto'

Even after Silicon Valley Bank crumbled and tech workers have been laid off in the thousands, Silicon Valley is still surrounded by a mythos of progress and futurity. Host Brittany Luse talks to author Malcolm Harris about his new book, Palo Alto: A History of California, Capitalism, and the World, to break down how that mythos was built, the dark underbelly underneath it, and why the tech industry is a microcosm of American capitalism.

Silicon Valley Bank and the sordid history of 'Palo Alto'

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Tuesday

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Friday

Angela Weiss / AFP; Michael Rowe/Getty Images

Monday

Friday

Kyle Mazza/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images; Maskot/Getty Images

Fear, Florida, and The 1619 Project

How should U.S history be told, and who gets to tell it? Debate over these questions has raged for years – but nowhere is it more pronounced right now than in Florida. This week, Brittany Luse chats with NPR's Giulia Heyward to get the download on Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis' recent efforts to ban AP African American studies in his state. Then, Brittany sits down with Dorothy Roberts, a legal scholar and sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and Leslie Alexander, a historian at Rutgers University. In line with their work on The 1619 Project – now a Hulu documentary series –they make the case that slavery led to some of our biggest political fissures today, and discuss why it's important for all Americans to understand those connections.

Fear, Florida, and The 1619 Project

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Friday

Kelela Joseph Okpako/Getty Images; Kyle Gustafson / For The Washington Post via Getty Images; Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images; Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Okpako/Getty Images; Kyle Gustafson / For The Washington Post via Getty Images; Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images; Rich Fury/Getty Images

Kelela's guide for breaking up with men

If you haven't stepped into an underground club in the last decade, you might be forgiven if you don't know Kelela. But the Washington, D.C. native has had a seismic impact on dance music since she broke into the scene in 2013. Now, after a six-year hiatus, Kelela is out with her fourth and latest record, 'Raven' – and with it, she's remaking the future of dance music. This week, host Brittany Luse sits down with Kelela to discuss Black queer liberation, and how she hopes this record helps folks find freedom on the dance floor.

Kelela's guide for breaking up with men

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Wednesday

Friday

Netflix; Warner Bros. Media; Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Hot and kinda bothered by 'Magic Mike'; plus Penn Badgley on bad boys

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Friday

Raymond Boyd/Getty Images; Paul Natkin/Getty Images; Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Jazz At Lincoln Center; Noam Galai/Getty Images for Jazz At Lincoln Center

Friday

NPR

Saying goodbye to Pikachu and Ash, plus how Pokémon changed media forever

It's the end of an era. After more than 25 years, The Pokémon Company is closing the book on the adventures of Ash Ketchum and Pikachu. To celebrate the cultural impact of this dynamic duo – and of the Pokémon franchise – Brittany Luse sits down with actor Sarah Natochenny, who's voiced Ash since 2006. Sarah talks about growing up with a character who stays 10 years old, and how fans have been the lifeblood of the show. Then, Brittany sits down with Dexter Thomas, VICE News correspondent and Japanese culture critic, and Daniel Dockery, author of Monster Kids: How Pokémon Taught a Generation to Catch Them All. They explore how Pokémon transformed gaming and children's TV in the U.S. and became one of the biggest media franchises in the world.

Saying goodbye to Pikachu and Ash, plus how Pokémon changed media forever

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Tuesday

Allyson Riggs/A24

Oscar nominee Stephanie Hsu is everywhere, all at once

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Friday

Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images, Karla Ortiz, Tuck Woodstock

One of Grindr's favorite podcasts; plus, art versus AI

It's in our homes and in our pockets, and now artificial intelligence is in our art. The runaway rise of AI generator apps has sparked hot debate around the technology's impact on creative industries. Brittany Luse talks to Karla Ortiz, an artist who's part of a new lawsuit against a group of companies that use AI to generate images. Ortiz gives her take on why it's important to regulate this technology, and why everyone – not just artists – has a stake in the issue. Then, Brittany talks to Tuck Woodstock, host of the 'Gender Reveal' podcast, about the show's five-year mark and how we can all talk about gender in more informed ways.

One of Grindr's favorite podcasts; plus, art versus AI

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Friday

Mike Harrington/Getty Images; Hulu; Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; Gilbert Flores/Variety via Getty Images

Curls and courage with Michaela Angela Davis and Rep. Cori Bush

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Thursday