Juma Sei Juma Sei is a 2022-2023 Kroc Fellow at NPR.
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Juma Sei

Lauren Song
Headshot of Juma Sei
Lauren Song

Juma Sei

Kroc Fellow

Juma Sei is a 2022-2023 Kroc Fellow at NPR. He is a Sierra Leonean-American from Portland, Oregon, and a 2022 graduate of Yale College.

Informed by a nomadic upbringing between the United States, Sierra Leone and China, Sei studied the sociopolitical elements of race and citizenship as an American Studies major. Outside the classroom, Sei spent his days building community as captain of the varsity track and field team, a first-year counselor and a mentor to Black students in the New Haven area. Though Sei discovered his love for audio early in college by co-hosting a student radio show called "Downtime," he came to journalism later as a contributing writer for The Politic and member of the Yale Daily News editorial board.

In his free time, you'll either find him watching The Simpsons or cycling on his beloved vintage Peugeot.

Story Archive

Saturday

60 years ago, Martin Luther King Jr. gave an early version of 'I Have A Dream' speech

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Monday

Navigating the housing market when it's unclear when it will improve

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Experts say don't wait for interest rates to drop before you buy a house

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Monday

Monday

An 'open house' flag is displayed outside a single family home on September 22, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. The U.S. housing market is seeing a slow down in home sales due to the Federal Reserve raising mortgage interest rates to help fight inflation. Allison Dinner/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Dinner/Getty Images

Tuesday

The Savannah Bananas huddle on the field at Grayson Stadium in Savannah, Georgia, before playing a team of retired Major League Baseball players on March 11, 2023. Benjamin Payne/Georgia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Benjamin Payne/Georgia Public Broadcasting

MLB's Opening Day is almost here, but Banana Ball is happening now!

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Saturday

Sunday

Demonstrators protest Florida Governor Ron DeSantis plan to eliminate Advanced Placement courses on African American studies in high schools as they stand outside the Florida State Capitol on February 15, 2023 in Tallahassee, Florida. Joshua Lott/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In a contentious political climate, Black communities continue to educate their own

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Saturday

From a day at Freedom: How one Virginia educator teaches Black history with joy

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Wednesday

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and his administration rejected the original curriculum for the African American studies course in January. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Saturday

Speaker of the House Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., receives the gavel from House Democratic leader Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., after McCarthy was elected speaker in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol early Saturday morning. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Wednesday

Tuesday

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, center, (D-Calif.), surrounded by Senate and House members, participate in a bill enrollment ceremony for H.R.8404, the Respect For Marriage Act on Dec. 8. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

A man wearing American flag pants casts his ballot at a voting station in Los Angeles on Tuesday. On Wednesday, the LA County district attorney dropped charges against the CEO of Konnech, which makes scheduling software for poll workers. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

Friday

Thursday

U.S. President Ronald Reagan quiets a cheering crowd at a Republican rally in November 1986. Douglas C. Pizac/AP hide caption

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Douglas C. Pizac/AP

The devastating history of midterm elections, for the party in the White House

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