Michael Copley Michael Copley is a correspondent on NPR's Climate Desk.
Stories By

Michael Copley

Michael Copley

Correspondent, Climate Desk

Michael Copley is a correspondent on NPR's Climate Desk. He covers what corporations are and are not doing in response to climate change, and how they're being impacted by rising temperatures.

Before joining NPR, Copley was a reporter at S&P Global, where he covered the energy industry and green investing. He was the first reporter to reveal the solar industry's links to China's Xinjiang region, where Beijing is accused of persecuting Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities.

Copley was part of a team at S&P Global that was a finalist for a Dateline Award in 2020 for a series of stories that documented how a building spree of natural gas infrastructure threatens to leave American energy consumers holding the bill for stranded fossil fuel assets. He also investigated the auto industry's failure to disclose the risk of human rights abuses in the supply chains for electric vehicles. The work was named enterprise story of the year in 2019 by the American Society of Business Publication Editors.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Thursday

Wednesday

Morning traffic fills the SR2 freeway in Los Angeles, California. The EPA released new rules for vehicle emissions that are expected to cut tailpipe pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, which are fueling climate change. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

In a boost for EVs, EPA finalizes strict new limits on tailpipe emissions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239092833/1239767599" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Public companies must start giving investors information about climate, SEC decides

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1236396057/1236396058" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A flare burns off methane and other hydrocarbons as oil pumpjacks operate in the Permian Basin in Midland, Texas. Burning fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas is the main driver of global warming. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Thursday

Monday

Why ExxonMobil is taking climate activists to court

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1233856042/1233856043" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Tuesday

Monday

The annual international climate meeting kicks off later this week in Dubai

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1215332277/1215332278" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wind turbines generate electricity off the coast of England. World leaders will meet later this week in Dubai to discuss global efforts to reduce emissions of planet-warming pollution and transition to renewable energy sources. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Frank Augstein/AP

Monday

Thursday

Climate activists protest on the first day of the ExxonMobil trial outside the New York State Supreme Court building on 2019. Last month, prosecutors described how ExxonMobil tried to take advantage of material stolen by hackers working for Aviram Azari. ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

People work at a landfill in India that's full of plastic bags. Members of the United Nations are negotiating a treaty that's aimed at cutting plastic pollution globally. Shammi Mehra/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Shammi Mehra/AFP via Getty Images

The world is awash in plastic. Oil producers want a say in how it's cleaned up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1211843512/1212952958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Thursday

A man walks over his collapsed mud house after heavy monsoon rains in Pakistan in 2022. Climate change makes heavy rain more common, because a hotter atmosphere can hold more moisture. Fida Hussain/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fida Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

The SEC is finalizing climate rules while California has its own regulations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1207028363/1207028364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Farmer Rob Stone (R) and Gregory Gingera, a canola breeder at Corteva Agriscience, walk through Stone's field in Davidson, Saskatchewan, Canada in May. Canadian farmers are looking for ways to deal with recurrent drought, including planting earlier and using seeds that are more resistant to heat. GEOFF ROBINS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
GEOFF ROBINS/AFP via Getty Images

Saturday

In this aerial picture taken on Aug. 21, a vehicle drives through floodwaters following heavy rains from Tropical Storm Hilary in Thousand Palms, Calif. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

California's lawsuit says oil giants downplayed climate change. Here's what to know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1199974919/1200032878" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Internal Exxon documents obtained by The Wall Street Journal span Rex Tillerson's tenure as the company's chief executive from 2006 until 2016. Brian Harkin/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Harkin/Getty Images

Friday

How this summer's extreme heat waves are connected to flooding, hurricanes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198373662/1198373663" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

A row of mailboxes tagged with evacuation notices during the Oak Fire in Mariposa, Calif., in July 2022. Many residents in the area are losing their home insurance because of rising wildfire risk. David Odisho/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Odisho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How climate change could cause a home insurance meltdown

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1186540332/1189831568" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Monday

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 10: A mobile billboard calling out House Oversight Committee Republicans rolls past the U.S. Capitol on May 10, 2023 in Washington, DC. Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Congressional Integrity Project hide caption

toggle caption
Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Congressional Integrity Project