Michael Copley Michael Copley is a correspondent on NPR's Climate Desk.
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Michael Copley

Michael Copley

Correspondent, Climate Desk

Michael Copley is a correspondent on NPR's Climate Desk. He covers what corporations are and are not doing in response to climate change, and how they're being impacted by rising temperatures.

Before joining NPR, Copley was a reporter at S&P Global, where he covered the energy industry and green investing. He was the first reporter to reveal the solar industry's links to China's Xinjiang region, where Beijing is accused of persecuting Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities.

Copley was part of a team at S&P Global that was a finalist for a Dateline Award in 2020 for a series of stories that documented how a building spree of natural gas infrastructure threatens to leave American energy consumers holding the bill for stranded fossil fuel assets. He also investigated the auto industry's failure to disclose the risk of human rights abuses in the supply chains for electric vehicles. The work was named enterprise story of the year in 2019 by the American Society of Business Publication Editors.

Story Archive

Thursday

Barges were stranded by low water levels along the Mississippi River in October, driving up shipping prices and threatening crop exports and fertilizer shipments. Scientists at the University of Memphis expect more dramatic swings in water levels on the river due to climate change. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Wednesday

House GOP likely to begin inquiries into environmental, social and governance issues

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Monday

To close America's remaining coal plants, many industry analysts believe the country needs natural gas to ensure reliable energy supplies until cleaner options like battery storage are widely available. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The U.S. wants to slash carbon emissions from power plants. Natural gas is in the way

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Electricity companies throw a wrench in Biden's plans to eliminate greenhouse gases

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Wednesday

Workers wait to get off an elevator at a coal mine in eastern Ukraine. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Three Takeaways From The COP27 Climate Conference

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Sunday

The COP27 summit went late into overtime, with Sameh Shoukry, president of the climate summit, speaking during a closing session on Sunday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Did the world make progress on climate change? Here's what was decided at global talks

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Wednesday

Climate activists at the United Nations climate conference in Egypt call for money to pay for loss and damage from global warming in low-income countries. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Friday

Thursday

Workers at a coal mine in Ukraine start their shifts. Russia's invasion of Ukraine disrupted global supplies of fossil fuels and led to more reliance on coal for electricity in some countries. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Wednesday

Former US Vice President Al Gore speaks during the TRACE Greenhouse Gas Inventory launch at the plenary hall during the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference COP27. Gehad Hamdy/dpa/Picture Alliance via Getty hide caption

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Gehad Hamdy/dpa/Picture Alliance via Getty

United States Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry said in Egypt that he knows carbon markets have gotten a bad reputation but that strong safeguards would make the U.S. program different. AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images

At this year's U.N. climate conference, a major focus is boosting investment in developing countries. Experts say renewable energy projects like this wind farm in South Africa can be attractive to private investors. Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images

Investors have trillions to fight climate change. Developing nations get little of it

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Tuesday

Muhammad Shehbaz Sharif, prime minister of Pakistan, listens to speeches during the conference. He took the stage today, as well, explaining the impact of catastrophic flooding in Pakistan this summer. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Monday

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, listens to Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, giving a speech during the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit. Nariman El-Mofty/AP hide caption

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Nariman El-Mofty/AP

Heavy rain caused floods in northeastern Thailand in October 2022. Millions of people around the world would benefit from more timely and accurate warnings about climate-driven extreme weather such as floods and heat waves. A new United Nations initiative plans to spend $3.1 billion on such early warning systems. Sukanya Buontha/AP hide caption

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Sukanya Buontha/AP