Danielle Kaye Danielle Kaye is a 2022-2023 Kroc Fellow.
Headshot of Danielle Kaye
Stories By

Danielle Kaye

Sana Khader
Headshot of Danielle Kaye
Sana Khader

Danielle Kaye

Kroc Fellow

Danielle Kaye (she/her) is a 2022-2023 Kroc Fellow. Before joining NPR, Kaye worked as a business reporter at Reuters, where she covered compensation policies and union organizing at technology and retail companies. She graduated from UC Berkeley in 2021 with degrees in Global Studies and French. While studying in Berkeley, Kaye reported and produced for listener-funded radio station KPFA, covering protests and housing issues in California for KPFA's morning public affairs show. She was also a researcher at UC Berkeley's Human Rights Investigations Lab and a news reporter and editor at the student-run newspaper The Daily Californian. Kaye lived with a host family in Dakar, Senegal, in 2019, which inspired her to write her senior thesis about threats to Senegal's artisanal fishing communities.

Story Archive

Encore: Evictions reach pre-pandemic levels in Los Angeles County

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1141047778/1141063870" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Martha Escudero in the kitchen of her home in the El Sereno neighborhood of Los Angeles, Calif. on Nov. 20, 2022. Stella Kalinina for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Stella Kalinina for NPR

'Flood of evictions' looms in Los Angeles as pandemic tenant protections expire

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140078409/1140671265" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Joe Kramer sings during the outdoor service at the Southwest Baptist Church in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sunday, Oct. 30, 2022. Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Octavio Jones for NPR

'Your whole life is gone': Elderly retirees in Florida struggle to rebuild after Ian

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137413838/1138206083" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Elderly people who survived Hurricane Ian are faced with a choice: to stay or to go?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137963844/1137963845" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jimmy Driggers and his wife Shirley pose for a portrait on Oct. 28, 2022 in Pine Island, Fla., where their home was severely flooded by a storm surge from Hurricane Ian in September. Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Octavio Jones for NPR

Still reeling from Ian, Florida shrimpers are desperate to get back on the water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1134465779/1136673055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript