Emmanuel Akinwotu Emmanuel Akinwotu is an international correspondent for NPR.
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Emmanuel Akinwotu

Terna Iwar
Headshot of Emmanuel Akinwotu
Terna Iwar

Emmanuel Akinwotu

International Correspondent, Lagos, Nigeria

Emmanuel Akinwotu is an international correspondent for NPR. He joined NPR in 2022 from The Guardian, where he was West Africa correspondent.

He has reported in Africa since 2016, covering a wide range of prominent and under-reported stories, from the war in Sudan that has torn through the country and sparked one of the worst humanitarian crises and an exodus of refugees to neighboring countries, to the rise of military takeovers in West and Central Africa. He has covered the growing international dominance of African music, interviewing music stars from Angelique Kidjo to Tems and Davido, as well as the rise of the drill rap scene in Ghana, partly inspired by similar movements in Chicago, New York and London. He has reported on the growing flight of young people from Nigeria in search of a better life abroad, and from coastal towns in Senegal, covering the toll that widespread migration to Europe has on families left behind. In 2020, he reported from major protests in Nigeria against police brutality that, despite being violently suppressed, were a galvanizing moment for many young people seeking change.

Before The Guardian, he worked as a correspondent for Agence France-Presse news, working on misinformation and then as a general reporter on Nigeria, Ghana, Benin and Togo. Previous to that, he was a freelance reporter for The New York Times and other media. In 2018 he co-led a NYT investigation into how scores of Shia Muslim protesters were killed near the Nigerian capital, Abuja, by a special military unit directly answerable to Nigeria's president.

He is a once proud and now fairly tortured fan of Manchester United and the Philadelphia 76ers. He was born in London and moved to Lagos in 2016, in reverse to the move his parents made when they left Nigeria for the U.K. in the 1980s. Emmanuel notes his dad has gone from concern about the merits of this decision, to taking full credit for it.

Story Archive

Monday

Cote D'Ivoire players celebrate after winning the African Cup of Nations final soccer match between Nigeria and Cote D'Ivoire, at the Olympic Stadium of Ebimpe in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, Sunday, Feb. 11 Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

Watching the Africa cup of Nations soccer final in a bar in Lagos

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Ivory Coast came out on top at the Africa Cup of Nations by defeating Nigeria 2-1

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Wednesday

Supporters of the Alliance Of Sahel States (AES) drive with flags as they celebrate Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger leaving the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in Niamey on January 28, 2024. Hama Boureima/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hama Boureima/AFP via Getty Images

After the coups, West Africa's Brexit moment

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Tuesday

Secretary Blinken's agenda as he travels Africa

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Sunday

Nigerian police rescue 5 kidnapped sisters in rare outcome after public outrage

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Tuesday

A kidnapping of six sisters and a murder has gripped Nigeria

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Friday

Okatakyi Dr Amanfi VII is known as the paramount chief of Asebu and created the Pan African Village project there in Ghana. Jude Lartey for NPR hide caption

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Jude Lartey for NPR

Monday

Artist Dafe Oboro (right), winner of the Nigerian Prize Award of the Access ART X Prize 2022/23, chats with an attendee at the 2023 Art X fair in Lagos, Nigeria. Manny Jefferson for NPR hide caption

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Manny Jefferson for NPR

Portraying Africa's Beauty and Challenges Through Music and Art

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Friday

Pan African village for returning diaspora in Ghana becomes a source of bitterness

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Thursday

Brutal 8-month war for control of Sudan has devastated much of the country

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Thursday

A look at the Democratic Republic of Congo's chaotic presidential vote

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Wednesday

Congolese head to the polls to elect their next president

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Tuesday

Friday

Catholic Cardinal in Ghana says homosexuality should not be a criminal offense

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Friday

There's growing demand for answers about the death of an Afrobeats star

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Saturday

An attendee views one of rising artist Adulphina Imuede's dreamlike illustrations at ART X. Manny Jefferson for NPR hide caption

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Manny Jefferson for NPR

Africa's flourishing art scene is a smash hit at Art X

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Wednesday

The booming African art scene congregates at the biggest art fair in West Africa

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Friday

Sudanese American rapper Bas in Khartoum during more peaceful times. Kgotso Aphane/The Fiends/Bas hide caption

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Kgotso Aphane/The Fiends/Bas

Sudanese American rapper Bas on using music to cope with the brutal conflict in Sudan

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Thursday

A Sudanese family sit on a cart after reaching Adre from the border of Sudan heading to the Adre camp, where around 200,000 people are currently taking refuge on September 19, 2023 in Adre, Chad. Abdulmonam Eassa/Getty Images hide caption

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Abdulmonam Eassa/Getty Images

A massive civilian displacement caused by war— but not the war you're thinking of

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International efforts to end the war in Sudan have waned

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Saturday

A man stands by as a fire rages in a livestock market area in al-Fasher, the capital of Sudan's North Darfur state, on Sept. 1, in the aftermath of bombardment by the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF). AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Sudan's war passed 6 months, with much of the world consumed by other conflicts

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Tuesday

Security vacuum in the Sahel leaves Timbuktu blockaded by Islamist militants

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Thursday

Workers in front of the doors of a revered 15th-century mosque in 2016. The doors were hacked apart by jihadists in Mali's ancient city of Timbuktu in 2012 and now unveiled restored to their former glory. Now the city is under siege again. Sebastien Rieussec/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastien Rieussec/AFP via Getty Images

A security vacuum in the Sahel has left Timbuktu blockaded by Islamist militants

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Monday

A general view of the administrative district in Libreville on September 2023. -/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP via Getty Images

What life is like in Gabon — a month after a military takeover

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