Dara Kerr Dara Kerr is a tech reporter for NPR. She examines the choices tech companies make and the influence they wield over our lives and society.
Headshot of Dara Kerr
Stories By

Dara Kerr

Dara Kerr
Headshot of Dara Kerr
Dara Kerr

Dara Kerr

Reporter, Business Desk

Dara Kerr is a tech reporter for NPR. She examines the choices tech companies make and the influence they wield over our lives and society.

Kerr came to NPR from The Markup, where she covered labor at tech companies. She investigated the risks that Uber and Lyft drivers take — and the lack of protection the tech companies provide them. She also reported on big tech lobbying and the spread of anti-vaccine misinformation on Facebook.

Before The Markup, Kerr reported for CNET News. Her daily coverage ranged from Airbnb's regulatory battles to self-driving cars to the proliferation of lab-grown meat. While at CNET, Kerr traveled the length of the Texas-Mexico border to report on how surveillance technology is used throughout the region. She also went to Brazil to write about how one Amazonian tribe is using technology to fight deforestation.

Kerr is originally from Colorado and spent several years living in Latin America. She's based in the Bay Area.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Apple software chief Craig Federighi, right, pictured with exec John Giannandrea, announced a partnership with OpenAI to bring AI features to its products. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu) Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Chiu/AP

OPEN AI TECH ON APPLE DEVICES

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/nx-s1-4999051/nx-s1-6c5ed477-7998-4387-8fb3-1004371651fc" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Could a major update to Apple's iPad be the reset that the company needs?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1249886146/1249886147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

As closing arguments in Google's monopoly trial wrap up, other tech giants watch closely

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1249166871/1249166872" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

A judge hears closing arguments in an antitrust case against Google

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1248863443/1248863444" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

The Department of Justice and a group of 35 states sued Google in 2020 for allegedly using anticompetitive tactics to monopolize online search. The trial is over and closing arguments are under way. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Friday

Google has a contract with the Israeli government where it provides the country with cloud computing services. Not all Google employees are happy about that. Alexander Koerner/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Koerner/Getty Images

Google worker says the company is 'silencing our voices' after dozens are fired

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245757317/1245772867" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Thursday

Google fires 28 workers who protested selling technology to Israel

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245654926/1245654927" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Even OpenAI says its new voice cloning tool has major potential for misuse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1242933678/1242938066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sunday

A billionaire's land purchases in rural Hawaii have locals worried

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241923492/1241927809" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

DOJ files lawsuit against Apple, accusing tech giant of abusing power as a monopoly

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239991727/1239998588" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Thursday

A tech billionaire has quietly bought hundreds of acres in Hawaii. Locals wonder why

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1238653835/1238653836" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Waymo car is seen on the streets of San Francisco on Aug. 25, 2023. -/AFP/AFP TV/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
-/AFP/AFP TV/AFP via Getty Images

Waymo's robotaxi service set to expand into Los Angeles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1238489046/1238496230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Wednesday

Lawmakers grilled the CEOs of top social media companies in a hearing today

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228214209/1228215058" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified on Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee about the dangers of child sexual exploitation on social media, including Meta's Facebook and Instagram. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

'You have blood on your hands,' senator tells Mark Zuckerberg for failing kids online

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1228062503/1228270374" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tuesday

Amid pressure, Meta says its rolling out protections for teenage users

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1223786938/1223788681" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facebook and Instagram parent Meta is facing pressure to make its apps safer for teens. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lionel Bonaventure/AFP via Getty Images

Under growing pressure, Meta vows to make it harder for teens to see harmful content

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1223583540/1223842408" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Saturday

The year is ending on a very different note for driverless cars than how it started

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1222272978/1222272979" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cruise rolled out hundreds of its robotaxis in San Francisco this year. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Driverless car startup Cruise's no good, terrible year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1222083720/1222507068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Wednesday

Sam Altman looks on during the APEC CEO Summit at Moscone West on Nov. 16, 2023 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

OpenAI reinstates Sam Altman as its chief executive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1214621010/1214640065" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Hundreds of OpenAI workers threaten to leave over CEO Sam Altman's firing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1214281184/1214281185" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Facebook and Instagram parent Meta is under fire for not doing enough to protect young users. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lionel Bonaventure/AFP via Getty Images