Mohamad ElBardicy Mohamad ElBardicy is an editor on Morning Edition and the UpFirst podcast.
Stories By

Mohamad ElBardicy

Mohamad ElBardicy

Mohamad ElBardicy is an editor on Morning Edition and the UpFirst podcast. Before joining NPR in 2019, his career focused on international news with Al-Jazeera, CNN, Eurovision and other outlets during his 15 years in journalism. He's produced, edited and reported stories from around the world. ElBardicy's field work during 2011's Arab Spring helped shape his mission to bring global views and voices to American audiences. He is an American-Egyptian who speaks Arabic fluently and, when he's not being a news junky, you can find him practicing Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

Story Archive

Thursday

Gaza Strip, Rafah | April 2019| Impressions the Rafah Zoo before the start of the most recent war in Gaza. Bogdan Baraghin/Four Paws hide caption

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Bogdan Baraghin/Four Paws

Another side effect from war in Gaza? Animals starving in its besieged zoos

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Monday

Tens of thousands of pro-Palestinian activists take part in a National March to call for a permanent ceasefire in Gaza on December 9, 2023, in London, United Kingdom. Mark Kerrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Kerrison/Getty Images

Why watermelons are a symbol of Palestinian solidarity

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Wednesday

Mohammed AbuSafia came to the U.S. in July for a two-month medical program at the Cleveland Clinic, but he was stranded in the U.S. by the war in Gaza. At least 39 of his relatives have since been killed. Mohammed AbuSafia hide caption

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Mohammed AbuSafia

Palestinians in Chicago mourn loss of family in Gaza

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Ahmed Alnaouq is a journalist in London and the founder of the group We Are Not Numbers. Alnaouq lost more than 20 members of his own family on October 22 when a missile hit his home in southern Gaza. Ahmed Alnaouq hide caption

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Ahmed Alnaouq

Gazan journalist says over 20 members of his family were killed in airstrike

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Monday

In Chicago, a family from Gaza mourns relatives killed in Israel-Hamas fighting

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Thursday

Smoke rising over Khartoum, Sudan, this week after an internationally brokered cease-fire failed. Marwan Ali/AP hide caption

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Marwan Ali/AP

Khartoum's hospital system has collapsed after cease-fire fails

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Friday

Imran Khan in his residence in Lahore, Pakistan on Tuesday. Saad Sarfraz Sheikh for NPR hide caption

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Saad Sarfraz Sheikh for NPR

Recovering from bullet wounds, Pakistan's Imran Khan talks of new waves of protest

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Tuesday

Thursday

A long investigation by Ken Dornstein, a documentary filmmaker whose brother died in the attack, identified Libyan Abu Agela Mas'ud Kheir Al-Marimi as the possible maker of the bomb that shattered the New York-bound Boeing 747 as it flew over Lockerbie, Scotland, on Dec. 21, 1988. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Filmmaker Details Investigation That Identified Alleged Pan Am Flight 103 Bomb-Maker

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Tuesday

Emily Harrington became the first woman to climb, in less than one day, the Golden Gate route of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park, pictured here in June 2015. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

Emily Harrington Is 1st Woman To Free-Climb El Capitan's Golden Gate Route In 1 Day

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Friday

A chain-link fence lock is seen on a gate at a closed Ranchito Elementary School in the San Fernando Valley section of Los Angeles on July 13. Amid spiking coronavirus cases, the Los Angeles Unified School District is implementing a testing contact tracing plan. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

School Nurses To Play Big Role In Eventual Reopening Of In-Class Learning In LA

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Wednesday

Muslims Celebrate Ramadan Virtually As Pandemic Restricts Large Gatherings

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Monday

As a large number of companies opt to work from home, cybersecurity experts say it's a hacker's paradise. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Cybersecurity Lawyer Who Flagged The WHO Hack Warns Of 'Massive' Remote Work Risks

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