Kaity Kline Kaity Kline is an Assistant Producer at Morning Edition and Up First.
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Kaity Kline

Kaity Kline

Assistant Producer, Morning Edition and Up First

Kaity Kline is an Assistant Producer at Morning Edition and Up First. She started at NPR in 2019 as a Here & Now intern and has worked at nearly every NPR news magazine show since.

Kline is from New Jersey and graduated from Mercer County Community College in 2016 and Rowan University in 2019.

While at Rowan Radio, Kline was a one-man band for a talk show that won a Gracie Award for best student talk show. She also hosted a late-night rock and metal show. In her free time she yells at reality TV shows, plays video games, and plays guitar.

Story Archive

Tuesday

Serj Tankian, singer for System of a Down Travis Shinn/Hachette Books hide caption

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Travis Shinn/Hachette Books

System of a Down's Serj Tankian on his memoir, why a new album hasn't come since 2005

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Monday

New Jersey is known as the diner capital of the world. But over the past decade, around 150 diners have closed in the state. The ones that remain have made big changes to survive. Peter Sedereas hide caption

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Peter Sedereas

New Jersey diners adapt to survive in state dubbed 'diner capital of the world'

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Thursday

Two of the main characters from the 2015 game Life is Strange, Max Caulfield and Chloe Price. Dontnod Entertainment hide caption

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Dontnod Entertainment

A growing number of gamers are LGBTQ+, so why is representation still lacking?

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Tuesday

Questions are raised about how video games represent the LGBTQ community

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Wednesday

The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour during a fly around of the orbiting lab on Nov. 8, 2021. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The International Space Station retires soon. NASA won't run its future replacement.

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Wednesday

What space stations of the future could look like

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Wednesday

Mohammed AbuSafia came to the U.S. in July for a two-month medical program at the Cleveland Clinic, but he was stranded in the U.S. by the war in Gaza. At least 39 of his relatives have since been killed. Mohammed AbuSafia hide caption

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Mohammed AbuSafia

Palestinians in Chicago mourn loss of family in Gaza

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Ahmed Alnaouq is a journalist in London and the founder of the group We Are Not Numbers. Alnaouq lost more than 20 members of his own family on October 22 when a missile hit his home in southern Gaza. Ahmed Alnaouq hide caption

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Ahmed Alnaouq

Gazan journalist says over 20 members of his family were killed in airstrike

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Tuesday

Children go trick-or-treating on Oct. 31, 2022, in Houston. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Why the urban legend of contaminated Halloween candy won't disappear

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Wednesday

A cosplayer dressed as a boxed Barbie doll attends the MCM Comic Con at ExCeL exhibition centre in London on May 26, 2023. Henry Nicholls/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Henry Nicholls/AFP via Getty Images

It's a pink Halloween. Here are some of the most popular costumes of 2023

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Thursday

Lexi Montgomery poses with supplies she has purchased in the event of another storm in September 2017 in Miami Beach, Fla. Hurricane Irma was the first hurricane that Montgomery ever experienced. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

Friday

Rhiannon Giddens performs at 'A New York Evening With Rhiannon Giddens' at National Sawdust on August 17, 2023 in New York City. In this interview with NPR's Michel Martin, she reflects on her new album and more. Rob Kim/Getty Images for The Recording A hide caption

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Rob Kim/Getty Images for The Recording A

Rhiannon Giddens is searching for a 'little bit of joy to bounce into'

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Wednesday

Virginia Johnson, 73, the outgoing artistic director of Dance Theatre of Harlem poses in one of the company's ballet studios at 466 West 152nd street in New York City, N.Y. on Thursday, June 22, 2023. She joined the company in 1969 as a founding member and prima ballerina, returning to it as the Artistic Director from 2009-2023. Nicky Qumaina-Woo for NPR hide caption

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Nicky Qumaina-Woo for NPR

Virginia Johnson on her time at Dance Theatre of Harlem: 'It was love'

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Tuesday

An alligator floats in a pond during the second round of the Honda Classic golf tournament, on Feb. 24 in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

An unprovoked alligator attack is extremely rare — but the reptile is unpredictable

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Thursday

Assalah Shikhani with her daughters Lilian and Susan on Antakya Mountain on August 21, 2022. Assalah Shikhani hide caption

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Assalah Shikhani

An update from a Syrian teacher who lost her home and loved ones in the earthquakes

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Friday

Barbra Streisand in 1963, one year after the recording of her performance at The Bon Soir. WWD/Penske Media via Getty Images hide caption

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WWD/Penske Media via Getty Images

Barbra Streisand remembers the first time she 'felt the warmth of a spotlight'

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Thursday

Friday

In the Pokémon Snap games, you're not capturing mons and forcing them to fight — you're taking pictures of them in their natural habitats. Screenshot by Kaity Kline/Nintendo hide caption

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Screenshot by Kaity Kline/Nintendo

Friday

Thursday

Thursday

Genshin Impact has a huge world to explore, and a surprising amount of content for a free-to-play game. Screenshot by Kaity Kline/MiHoYo hide caption

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Screenshot by Kaity Kline/MiHoYo

Thursday

Thursday

Friday