Diane Webber Diane Webber is a supervising editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Headshot of Diane Webber
Stories By

Diane Webber

Courtesy of Diane Webber
Headshot of Diane Webber
Courtesy of Diane Webber

Diane Webber

Supervising Editor, Science Desk

Diane Webber is a supervising editor on NPR's Science Desk, specializing in health policy. She edits stories on reproductive health, mental health, Medicare, Medicaid, health insurance and caregiving, among other topics.

Prior to joining NPR in 2022, Webber spent 11 years as an editor at KFF Health News, a nonprofit health policy newsroom where she led a team of reporters covering implementation of the Affordable Care Act in partnership with NPR and member stations. She also edited the Bill of the Month series, another collaboration between NPR and KFF Health News, that sparked federal legislation known as the No Surprises Act in 2020.

Earlier in her career, Webber was the founding editor of Politico Pro Health Care, and an executive editor of classroom magazines at Scholastic. She wrote five nonfiction science and health books for middle schoolers, published by Scholastic.

Webber got her start in journalism at community newspapers in Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan. She also did a short stint on the New York Post's copy desk.

Webber grew up in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in a military family. She graduated from Barnard College, where she majored in philosophy and minored in dance. She is married to journalist Glenn Thrush, and they have two sons and a Jack Russell terrier.

Story Archive

Saturday

The "Rally for Life" march at the Texas State Capitol in Austin in January. Even groups that oppose abortion are asking for more clarity on exceptions to the state's abortion bans. Suzanne Cordiero/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Suzanne Cordiero/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

Wednesday

Secretary Xavier Becerra, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Becerra announced Wednesday his agency is seeing record enrollment numbers for Affordable Care Act health plans. Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for National Urban League hide caption

toggle caption
Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for National Urban League

For the third year in a row, ACA health insurance plans see record signups

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1220621785/1220726011" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Center for Reproductive Rights attorney Molly Duane speaks before the Texas Supreme Court in Austin on Nov. 28. The court ruled in a different abortion case on Monday. Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images

Sunday

Davey Bauer was near death six months ago after the flu and another bacterial infection wasted his lungs. Now he says he's feeling stronger each day as he recovers from a double lung transplant. José M. Osorio/Northwestern Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
José M. Osorio/Northwestern Medicine

Wednesday

A patient gets a low-dose CT scan to screen for lung cancer. The American Cancer Society on Wednesday recommended expanding who should have this annual screening test. PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PASCAL POCHARD-CASABIANCA/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

Wednesday

A patient prepares to take mifepristone, for a medication abortion. A federal appeals court ruled to impose new restrictions on the drug Wednesday but the ruling will not take effect until the Supreme Court weighs in. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Riedel/AP

Tuesday

Under Kevin Counihan, Connecticut's health insurance exchange used concerts and storefront offices to reach customers. Courtesy of Chion Wolf/WNPR hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Chion Wolf/WNPR