Tamara Keith Tamara Keith is a White House Correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.
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Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith covers business for NPR.
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Tamara Keith 2016
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Tamara Keith

White House Correspondent

Tamara Keith has been a White House correspondent for NPR since 2014 and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast, the top political news podcast in America. Keith has chronicled the Trump administration from day one, putting this unorthodox presidency in context for NPR listeners, from early morning tweets to executive orders and investigations. She covered the final two years of the Obama presidency, and during the 2016 presidential campaign she was assigned to cover Hillary Clinton. In 2018, Keith was elected to serve on the board of the White House Correspondents' Association.

Previously Keith covered congress for NPR with an emphasis on House Republicans, the budget, taxes, and the fiscal fights that dominated at the time.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world, from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues, and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake, and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived of and solely reported "The Road Back To Work," a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member station KQED's California Report, where she covered agriculture, the environment, economic issues, and state politics. She covered the 2004 presidential election for NPR Member station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and opened the state capital bureau for NPR Member station KPCC/Southern California Public Radio to cover then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited, and distributed for nine years.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Keith is part of the Politics Monday team on the PBS NewsHour, a weekly segment rounding up the latest political news. Keith is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

Story Archive

Palestinian Health Ministry staff members in Nablus receive 300,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccines donated by the United States through through the COVAX vaccine-sharing initiative on Aug. 24, 2021. Jaafar Ashtiyeh/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaafar Ashtiyeh/AFP via Getty Images

Biden's Vaccine Rule Covers Two-Thirds Of American Workers

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Biden Took A Tougher Stance Against People Resisting The Vaccine In Speech

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President Biden delivers remarks Thursday on his new plan to stop the spread of the delta variant and boost COVID-19 vaccinations. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Lays Out Plan To Mandate Vaccines Or Testing For Millions Of Workers

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9/11 Anniversary Will Be The Latest Instance When Biden Has Given A Voice To Grief

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There's A Chance That California Will Soon Have A Republican Governor

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Biden May Bring Up Climate Change When He Tours Ida Damage In The Northeast

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Do School Mask Bans Violate The Rights Of Children With Disabilities?

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A survey finds that 19% of U.S. adults now say they do not intend to be vaccinated. That's down from 24% the month prior. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Donner Tells The Story Of Her Great-Great-Aunt, Executed For Nazi Resistance

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President Biden rides his bike in Rehoboth Beach, Del., earlier this year with first lady Jill Biden. The family has a beach house nearby. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Dela-Where He'd Rather Be: Come The Weekend, Biden Leaves D.C.

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Why Biden Spends His Weekends Away From The White House

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Biden "Quadruple-Checked" That He Couldn't Stop Evictions. Then He Did.

Gene Sperling oversees the White House's rollout of COVID relief. On Monday, he told reporters that President Biden had "quadruple-checked" whether he had the legal grounds to extend the eviction moratorium unilaterally but said ultimately the president's hands were tied by a Supreme Court ruling that blocked the administration from extending its past moratorium beyond the end of July. Yesterday, the administration extended the renter protections anyway. And, the U.S. continues the hard task of global vaccine distribution.

Biden "Quadruple-Checked" That He Couldn't Stop Evictions. Then He Did.

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