Tamara Keith Tamara Keith is a NPR White House Correspondent.
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Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith covers business for NPR.

Roni Chambers, executive director of Go! Network (right), checks in Jennifer Barfield, 47, and her husband, Brian Barfield, 53, at a job networking meeting in downtown St. Louis. Whitney Curtis for NPR hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for NPR

What's Next For Fannie, Freddie? Hard To Say

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From Jobless To Home-Based Business: A Tough Sell

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Annica Trotter, 25, is feeling financially stressed by her job search. She recently had to cancel her Internet service and car insurance. Whitney Curtis for NPR hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for NPR

Former Fannie Mae CEO Franklin Raines (right) testifies on Capitol Hill in December 2008. Former Freddie Mac CEO Leland Brendsel (center) and former Fannie Mae chief Daniel Mudd (left) listen. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

JPMorgan Chase admitted to overcharging more than 4,000 active-duty military personnel on their home loans and said it foreclosed in error on 14 of them. The company will send out $2 million worth of refunds to 4,000 active-duty customers who were affected. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Bank Overcharged Military Families On Mortgages

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Randal Howland, 50, of St. Louis, lost his job over a year ago. Whitney Curtis for NPR hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for NPR

A bank-owned home in Miami, Fla., where foreclosure sales made up 39.7 percent in the most recent quarter, according to RealtyTrac. Analysts expect more foreclosures in early 2011. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

U.S. Home Foreclosures May Top 100,000 In January

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Satila Higgins, of Evansville, Ind., speaks with a prospective employer at a career fair in San Diego. Gregory Bull/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Gregory Bull/ASSOCIATED PRESS

2011 Jobs Outlook: Better, But Not As Good As It Was

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Snowstorm Derails Travelers Throughout Northeast

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Kenneth Reitz plans to spend his tax money on Apple products, e-books, apps and possibly a dinner with his fiancee. Courtesy of Kenneth Reitz hide caption

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Courtesy of Kenneth Reitz