Tamara Keith Tamara Keith is a Senior White House Correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.
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Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith covers business for NPR.
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith
Tamara Keith headshot
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith

Senior White House Correspondent

Tamara Keith has been a White House correspondent for NPR since 2014 and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast, the top political news podcast in America. In that time, she has chronicled the final years of the Obama administration, covered Hillary Clinton's failed bid for president from start to finish and threw herself into documenting the Trump administration, from policy made by tweet to the president's COVID diagnosis and January 6th. In the final year of the Trump administration and the first year of the Biden administration, she focused her reporting on the White House response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Her reporting often highlights small observations that tell a larger story about the president and the changing presidency.

In 2018, Keith was elected to serve on the board of the White House Correspondents' Association, then served as its president in 2022/23 during a momentous term that included a complete overhaul of the press workspace at the White House. In that role she led the press corps in its interactions with the White House, advocated for press conferences and coordinated travel. She also worked to demystify the White House beat for the public, in an effort to help restore trust in the press, an essential pillar of American democracy.

Previously Keith covered congress for NPR with an emphasis on House Republicans, the budget, taxes and the fiscal fights that dominated at the time.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world, from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake, and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived of and reported "The Road Back To Work," a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member station KQED's California Report, where she covered agriculture, the environment, economic issues and state politics. She covered the 2004 presidential election for NPR Member station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and opened the state capital bureau for NPR Member station KPCC to cover then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited and distributed for nine years, back before podcasts were cool. She is a regular contributor to PBS NewsHour, appearing each week as part of its Politics Monday segment.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Keith is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game. She serves on advisory boards for the University of California Center for Free Speech and Civic Engagement and the UC Berkeley J-School.

Story Archive

Thursday

Signs and buttons are scene before President Joe Biden speaks at the Carpenters Union Hall, Tuesday, April 16, 2024, in Scranton, Pa. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In The Ads Race, It's No Contest: Biden Is Swamping The Airwaves

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Sunday

Why some voters are convinced Biden won't really be on the ballot in November

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President Biden in Chandler, Ariz., on March 20. Biden is running for reelection, but a surprising number of voters don't believe it. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Yes, Biden is really running in November. But a lot of voters say they doubt it

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Saturday

Former President Barack Obama (left) and former President Bill Clinton (right) cheer for President Biden during a campaign fundraising event at Radio City Music Hall in New York City on March 28. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

President Joe Biden speaks in the Indian Treaty Room at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, Wednesday, April 3, 2024. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Thursday

President Biden called Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Thursday to express concerns about Israeli strikes that killed aid workers and humanitarian conditions in Gaza. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why some voters are convinced Biden won't really be on the ballot in November

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Monday

Sunday

The Reach app, as seen on volunteer Sarah Harrison's phone, allows Biden supporters to share content directly with their contacts, and is connected to a national Democratic party voter database. Maayan Silver/WUWM hide caption

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Maayan Silver/WUWM

It's easy to tune out politics. Biden's campaign is using an app to get around that

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Friday

Speaker of the House Mike Johnson, R-La., discusses President Joe Biden's policies at the Mexican border during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Roundup: Ouster Threat For Mike Johnson; Biden App Turns Volunteers Into Influencers

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Thursday

Friday

Wednesday

Vice President Harris speaks to reporters after her visit to a Planned Parenthood clinic in Saint Paul, Minn. on March 14. Stephen Maturen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/AFP via Getty Images

Harris visited an abortion clinic, a first for any president or vice president

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Tuesday

Special counsel Hur testifies about his Biden documents investigation

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Department of Justice Special Counsel Robert Hur listens during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

President Biden speaks to reporters about the special counsel report on his handling of classified documents in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House on Feb. 8. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Interview transcript shows more nuance on Biden's memory than special counsel report

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Robert Hur, the special counsel who led an investigation into President Biden's handling of classified documents, testifies alongside video of Biden to the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sunday

Friday

Karen Seagraves, 52, of Charlotte, N.C., is an unaffiliated voter who says she votes on issues, not by party or candidate. Kate Medley for NPR hide caption

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Kate Medley for NPR

We watched the State of the Union with one undecided voter. She wasn't that impressed

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Thursday

President Biden had a big moment during his 2023 State of the Union address where he sparred with Republicans. He's been talking about it ever since. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Biden's test in the State of the Union tonight is to show he's still got what it takes

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Tuesday

A North Carolina musician used his Super Tuesday polling place as a stage

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Nicole Sidman talks with prospective voter Rebekah Rubenstein on Sunday in Charlotte, N.C., ahead of Super Tuesday. Kate Medley for NPR hide caption

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Kate Medley for NPR

On Super Tuesday, abortion is driving Democrats to the polls in North Carolina

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Wednesday

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) walks to the Senate to speak on the Senate floor, Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2024 at the Capitol in Washington. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Michigan Votes; McConnell Vacates

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Tuesday

President Biden and Vice President Harris met with House Speaker Mike Johnson and other top congressional leaders in the Oval Office on Tuesday to discuss government funding and Ukraine aid. Roberto Schmidt/Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/Getty Images

Congressional leaders hope to avoid a shutdown. But Ukraine aid is still unclear

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