Tamara Keith Tamara Keith is a White House Correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.
Tamara Keith headshot
Stories By

Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith covers business for NPR.
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith
Tamara Keith headshot
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith

White House Correspondent

Tamara Keith has been a White House correspondent for NPR since 2014 and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast, the top political news podcast in America. In that time, she has chronicled the final years of the Obama administration, covered Hillary Clinton's failed bid for president from start to finish and thrown herself into documenting the Trump administration, from policy made by tweet to the president's COVID diagnosis and the insurrection. In the final year of the Trump administration and the first year of the Biden administration, she focused her reporting on the White House response to the COVID-19 pandemic, breaking news about global vaccine sharing and plans for distribution of vaccines to children under 12.

You can also catch Keith on Monday nights as part of the Politics Monday segment on the PBS NewsHour, a weekly segment rounding up the latest political news. In 2018, Keith was elected to serve on the board of the White House Correspondents' Association and it currently its vice president.

Previously Keith covered congress for NPR with an emphasis on House Republicans, the budget, taxes and the fiscal fights that dominated at the time.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world, from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake, and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived of and reported "The Road Back To Work," a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member station KQED's California Report, where she covered agriculture, the environment, economic issues and state politics. She covered the 2004 presidential election for NPR Member station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and opened the state capital bureau for NPR Member station KPCC to cover then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited and distributed for nine years, back before podcasts were cool.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Keith is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

Story Archive

President Biden started his presidency only selectively referring to his predecessor as "the former guy." But he's talking about Donald Trump frequently in recent weeks and months. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden used to keep Trump mentions to a minimum. Not anymore

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1115445768/1115542061" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biden's week: COVID, a 'historic' agreement and the GDP

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114613152/1114613153" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

2 possible 2024 presidential candidates, Trump and Pence, gave speeches in Washington

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114074961/1114074962" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former President Trump returns to Washington to deliver a policy speech

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1113615295/1113615296" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of the National Guard and the Washington D.C. police keep a small group of demonstrators away from the Capital after thousands of Donald Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol building following a "Stop the Steal" rally on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

NPR Politics Special: What We Learned From The Jan. 6 Hearings

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112965839/1113124988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Members of the National Guard and the Washington D.C. police keep a small group of demonstrators away from the Capital after thousands of Donald Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol building following a "Stop the Steal" rally on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Exposing The Secrets Of The January 6th Attack

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112939992/1113109808" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden tests positive for COVID-19 and is experiencing mild symptoms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112721118/1112723758" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Then-Republican Conference Chair Rep. Liz Cheney, flanked by House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, right, and Republican Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, criticizes Democrats' impeachment of then-President Donald Trump in December 2019. Now she is trying to convince the public that Trump is to blame for the Jan. 6 insurrection. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

With the midterms in their sights, defending Trump isn't a Republican priority

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112352638/1112411732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on efforts to lower high gas prices in the South Court Auditorium at Eisenhower Executive Office Building June 22, 2022 in Washington, DC. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Presidents Can't Fix Inflation. It Doesn't Stop Americans From Blaming Them For It.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111568834/1111578598" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jan. 6 Hearing: People Who Believed Trump Face Consequences. So Far, Trump Doesn't.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111215884/1111222671" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript