Tamara Keith Tamara Keith is a White House Correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.
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Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith covers business for NPR.
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith
Tamara Keith headshot
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith

White House Correspondent

Tamara Keith has been a White House correspondent for NPR since 2014 and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast, the top political news podcast in America. In that time, she has chronicled the final years of the Obama administration, covered Hillary Clinton's failed bid for president from start to finish and thrown herself into documenting the Trump administration, from policy made by tweet to the president's COVID diagnosis and the insurrection. In the final year of the Trump administration and the first year of the Biden administration, she focused her reporting on the White House response to the COVID-19 pandemic, breaking news about global vaccine sharing and plans for distribution of vaccines to children under 12.

You can also catch Keith on Monday nights as part of the Politics Monday segment on the PBS NewsHour, a weekly segment rounding up the latest political news. In 2018, Keith was elected to serve on the board of the White House Correspondents' Association and it currently its vice president.

Previously Keith covered congress for NPR with an emphasis on House Republicans, the budget, taxes and the fiscal fights that dominated at the time.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world, from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake, and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived of and reported "The Road Back To Work," a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member station KQED's California Report, where she covered agriculture, the environment, economic issues and state politics. She covered the 2004 presidential election for NPR Member station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and opened the state capital bureau for NPR Member station KPCC to cover then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited and distributed for nine years, back before podcasts were cool.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Keith is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

Story Archive

Students from George Washington University wear their graduation gowns outside of the White House in Washington, DC, on May 18, 2022. STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Thomas Caldwell, a defendant charged with seditious conspiracy in his connection to the January 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, arrives at federal court on September 28, 2022 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS), (L) Chair of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, and Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) preside over a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Final Jan. 6 Hearing Is Coming — Here's Everything We've Learned

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Week in politics: Justice Department appeals judge's order in Mar-A-Lago case

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Then-candidate Joe Biden speaks at a community event while campaigning on December 13, 2019 in San Antonio, Texas. Daniel Carde/Getty Images hide caption

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It's General Election Season! Live From Texas

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Former White House Director of Speechwriting Cody Keenan in the Oval Office, July 23, 2013. Pete Souza/The White House hide caption

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Pete Souza/The White House

Obama's Speechwriter On The Power Of Presidential Rhetoric

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A rainbow forms above the Colorado State Capitol as people gather in protest of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on June 24, 2022 in Denver, Colorado. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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A worker with the Detroit Department of Elections takes a break after sorting through absentee ballots at the Central Counting Board in the TCF Center on November 4, 2020 in Detroit, Michigan. Elaine Cromie/Getty Images hide caption

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Biden unveils the official White House portraits of the Obamas

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Portraits of President Obama and former first lady President Michelle Obama. Artist Robert McCurdy painted the former president's portrait and Sharon Sprung painted the former first lady's. The White House hide caption

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The White House

Former president Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally to support local candidates on September 03, 2022 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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US President Joe Biden speaks about the soul of the nation, outside of Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 1, 2022. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

The largest portion of a new White House funding request is for $22.4 billion in COVID-19 funding, money that would go toward stockpiling vaccines and tests, as well as to research and development and the global vaccine response. David Dermer/AP hide caption

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David Dermer/AP

President Biden will give a prime-time speech on Thursday about "the battle for the soul of the nation," a rally cry he and Democrats will use leading up to November midterm elections. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Biden to give a speech in Pennsylvania on the 'battle for the soul of the nation'

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