Tamara Keith Tamara Keith is a White House Correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.
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Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith covers business for NPR.
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith
Tamara Keith headshot
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith

White House Correspondent

Tamara Keith has been a White House correspondent for NPR since 2014 and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast, the top political news podcast in America. In that time, she has chronicled the final years of the Obama administration, covered Hillary Clinton's failed bid for president from start to finish and thrown herself into documenting the Trump administration, from policy made by tweet to the president's COVID diagnosis and the insurrection. In the final year of the Trump administration and the first year of the Biden administration, she focused her reporting on the White House response to the COVID-19 pandemic, breaking news about global vaccine sharing and plans for distribution of vaccines to children under 12.

You can also catch Keith on Monday nights as part of the Politics Monday segment on the PBS NewsHour, a weekly segment rounding up the latest political news. In 2018, Keith was elected to serve on the board of the White House Correspondents' Association and it currently its vice president.

Previously Keith covered congress for NPR with an emphasis on House Republicans, the budget, taxes and the fiscal fights that dominated at the time.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world, from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake, and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived of and reported "The Road Back To Work," a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member station KQED's California Report, where she covered agriculture, the environment, economic issues and state politics. She covered the 2004 presidential election for NPR Member station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and opened the state capital bureau for NPR Member station KPCC to cover then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited and distributed for nine years, back before podcasts were cool.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Keith is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

Story Archive

Boxes of scanned ballots sit on a pallet at the Maricopa County Tabulation and Election Center on November 09, 2022 in Phoenix, Arizona. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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DES MOINES, IOWA - FEBRUARY 3: Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and wife Dr. Jill Biden greet supporters at a caucus night watch party on February 3, 2020 in Des Moines, Iowa.(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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With Iowa No Longer First, Campaigns Will Have To Evolve

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Biden rolls out the red carpet for French President Macron's state visit

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Campaign signs for competing Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidates Doug Mastriano and Josh Shapiro sit in Mannheim, Pennsylvania on November 7, 2022. BRANDEN EASTWOOD/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Biden says he'll discuss whether to run for president again over Thanksgiving dinner

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How productive a divided government can be

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Clark County Election Department workers process polling place equipment and materials at an initial verification area at the Clark County Election Department after polls closed on November 08, 2022 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images) Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Misinformation's Limited Impact On The Midterms

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U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland delivers remarks at the U.S. Justice Department Building on November 18, 2022 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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A New Special Counsel Will Oversee Investigations Into Donald Trump

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US President Joe Biden speaks about the situation in Poland following a meeting with G7 and European leaders on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Nusa Dua on the Indonesian resort island of Bali on November 16, 2022. SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) speaks at his election night watch party after the midterm elections, early on November 9, 2022, in Washington, DC. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Gates, Maricopa County Board of Supervisors Chairman, speaks at a press conference on the midterm elections on November 02, 2022 in Phoenix, Arizona. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Voters aren't sure if they want Biden and Trump to launch 2024 presidential bids

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Stop the Steal signs are seen during the Kentucky Freedom Rally at the capitol building on August 28, 2021 in Frankfort, Kentucky Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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