Tamara Keith Tamara Keith is a White House Correspondent for NPR and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.
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Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith covers business for NPR.
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith
Tamara Keith headshot
Kate Hudson/Courtesy of Tamara Keith

Tamara Keith

White House Correspondent

Tamara Keith has been a White House correspondent for NPR since 2014 and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast, the top political news podcast in America. In that time, she has chronicled the final years of the Obama administration, covered Hillary Clinton's failed bid for president from start to finish and thrown herself into documenting the Trump administration, from policy made by tweet to the president's COVID diagnosis and the insurrection. In the final year of the Trump administration and the first year of the Biden administration, she focused her reporting on the White House response to the COVID-19 pandemic, breaking news about global vaccine sharing and plans for distribution of vaccines to children under 12.

You can also catch Keith on Monday nights as part of the Politics Monday segment on the PBS NewsHour, a weekly segment rounding up the latest political news. In 2018, Keith was elected to serve on the board of the White House Correspondents' Association and it currently its vice president.

Previously Keith covered congress for NPR with an emphasis on House Republicans, the budget, taxes and the fiscal fights that dominated at the time.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world, from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake, and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived of and reported "The Road Back To Work," a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member station KQED's California Report, where she covered agriculture, the environment, economic issues and state politics. She covered the 2004 presidential election for NPR Member station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and opened the state capital bureau for NPR Member station KPCC to cover then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited and distributed for nine years, back before podcasts were cool.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Keith is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

Story Archive

Monday

President Biden picks a new chief of staff: Jeff Zients

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President Biden's troubles with classified documents grew over the weekend

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Sunday

Jeff Zients removes his mask in this file photo from April 13, 2021. President Biden has decided to choose his former COVID-19 response coordinator as his new chief of staff, replacing Ron Klain. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Friday

The US Supreme Court said Thursday that an eight-month investigation that questioned 100 possible suspects had failed to find the source of the stunning leak last year of its draft abortion ruling. STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

President Donald Trump participates in a signing ceremony for H.R.266, the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act, with members of his administration and Republican lawmakers in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington DC on April 24th, 2020. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

PPP Loans Provided Lots Of Cash Assistance With Few Questions Asked

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Wednesday

Peterson Foundation billboard displaying the national debt is pictured on K Street on February 08, 2022 in downtown Washington, DC. (Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Peter G. Peterson Foundation) Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Peter G. Peters hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Peter G. Peters

Tuesday

A video showing Proud Boys members appear on screen during a House Select Committee hearing to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on June 9, 2022. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

The public was slow to learn that Biden's lawyers returned old classified documents

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Thursday

How the DOJ is investigating Biden's handling of classified documents when he was VP

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Tuesday

President Biden and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador found common ground in talks on migration, the economy and fentanyl interdiction. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Monday

Biden to talk migration, climate in Mexico City for North American Leaders' Summit

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President Joe Biden (L) is welcomed by his Mexican counterpart Andrés Manuel López Obrador upon landing at Felipe Angeles International Airport in Zumpango de Ocampo, north of Mexico City on January 8, 2023. Claudio Cruz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Claudio Cruz/AFP via Getty Images

Sunday

Politics chat: What a fragmented Republican party means for Biden's agenda

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Friday

Biden gives a dozen medals to people who helped protect democracy during Jan. 6 riot

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Thursday

Biden shares his border security plan ahead of trip to Mexico

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