Tanya Ballard Brown Tanya Ballard Brown is an editor for NPR. She joined the organization in 2008.
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Tanya Ballard Brown

Tanya Ballard Brown

Editor

Tanya Ballard Brown is an editor for NPR. She joined the organization in 2008.

As an editor, Tanya brainstorms and develops digital features; collaborates with radio editors and reporters to create compelling digital content that complements radio reports; manages digital producers and interns; and, edits stories appearing on NPR.org. Tanya also writes blog posts, commentaries and book reviews, has served as acting supervising editor for Digital Arts, Books and Entertainment; edited for Talk of the Nation and Tell Me More; and filed on-air news reports. She also has laughed loudly on NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast and Facebook Live segments.

Projects Tanya has worked on include Abused and Betrayed: People With Intellectual Disabilities And An Epidemic of Sexual Assault; Months After Pulse Shooting: 'There Is A Wound On The Entire Community'; Staving Off Eviction; Stuck in the Middle: Work, Health and Happiness at Midlife; Teenage Diaries Revisited; School's Out: The Cost of Dropping Out (video); Americandy: Sweet Land Of Liberty; Living Large: Obesity In America; the Cities Project; Farm Fresh Foods; Dirty Money; Friday Night Lives, and WASP: Women With Wings In WWII.

Tanya is former editor for investigative and longterm projects at washingtonpost.com and during her tenure there coordinated with the print and digital newsrooms to develop multimedia content. She has also been a reporter or editor at GovExec.com/Government Executive magazine, The Tennessean in Nashville and the (Greensboro) News & Record.

In her free time, Tanya fronts a band filled with other NPR staffers, sings show tunes, dances randomly in the middle of the newsroom, takes acting and improv classes, teaches at Georgetown University, does storytelling performances, and dreams of being a bass player. Or Sarah Vaughan. Whichever comes first.

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Story Archive

A memorial for Thomas Blevins Jr. was set up on June 25 in the alley where he was shot and killed two days earlier by Minneapolis police. On Monday, the district attorney announced he would not be charging the officers in Blevins' death. Youssef Rddad/AP hide caption

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Youssef Rddad/AP

Four women, including a state lawmaker, have accused Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill of sexual misconduct. Hill denies the charges and has called for an investigation. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Oregon state Rep. Janelle Bynum poses with the Clackamas County sheriff's deputy who responded to a call from someone who said Bynum was casing the neighborhood. The legislator said she was going door to door talking to constituents. Janelle Bynum/AP hide caption

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Janelle Bynum/AP

The U.K.'s head of Counter Terrorism Policing Neil Basu (right) and the chief medical officer for England Dame Sally Davies, speak at a news conference at New Scotland Yard in London on Wednesday. British police say a couple who are critically ill were exposed to the Russian nerve agent Novichok. John Stillwell/AP hide caption

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John Stillwell/AP

U.K. Police Investigating 2 New Cases Of Deadly Nerve Agent Poisoning

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People demonstrate in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, demanding an end to the separation of migrant children from their parents. On Friday, the Justice Department said in a court filing that "the government will not separate families but detain families together during the pendency of immigration proceedings." Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images

Police officers respond to a shooting at the Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Md., on Thursday. Greg Savoy/Reuters hide caption

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Greg Savoy/Reuters

Maryland Newsroom Shooting That Left 5 Dead Was 'Targeted Attack'

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North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un and South Korea's President Moon Jae-in walk together after a tree-planting ceremony at the truce village of Panmunjom on April 27. Korea Summit Press Pool via/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Korea Summit Press Pool via/AFP/Getty Images

Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown warms up before a basketball game against the Chicago Bulls on Jan. 28 in Chicago. A few days before that game, Milwaukee police used a stun gun on and arrested him over a parking violation. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Journalist Tom Brokaw responded to the accusations: "The meetings were brief, cordial and appropriate, and despite Linda's allegations, I made no romantic overtures towards her at that time or any other." Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Former NBC Correspondent Accuses Tom Brokaw Of Sexual Misconduct

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Bill Cosby departs the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa., on Wednesday. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Bill Cosby Found Guilty Of All Charges In Sexual Assault Retrial

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Andrea Constand leaves the courtroom after closing arguments on June 12, 2017. The judge declared a mistrial when the jury couldn't reach a verdict after more than 50 hours of deliberation. David Maialetti/AP hide caption

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David Maialetti/AP

The Cosby Trial: What You Need To Know

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott signs the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Act on Friday. The legislation includes a number of gun restrictions and also permits school personnel who are not full-time teachers to be armed. Mark Wallheiser/AP hide caption

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Mark Wallheiser/AP