Tanya Ballard Brown Tanya Ballard Brown is an editor for NPR.org. She joined the organization in 2008.
Tanya Ballard Brown
Anna Carson DeWitt Photography

Tanya Ballard Brown

Editor

Tanya N. Ballard is a Southern girl, an optimist and a wild dreamer who laughs loudly and often.

As an editor for NPR.org, Tanya brainstorms and develops digital features; collaborates with radio editors and reporters to create compelling digital content that complements radio reports; manages digital producers and interns; and, line edits stories appearing on the website. Tanya also writes blog posts, commentaries and book reviews, has served as acting supervising editor for Digital Arts, Books and Entertainment; edited for Talk of the Nation and Tell Me More; and filed on-air spots for newscast. Occasionally, she sits in with the Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast team and hosts NPR Facebook Live segments.

Projects she has worked on include Abused and Betrayed: People With Intellectual Disabilities And An Epidemic of Sexual Assault; Months After Pulse Shooting: 'There Is A Wound On The Entire Community'; Staving Off Eviction; Stuck in the Middle: Work, Health and Happiness at Midlife; Teenage Diaries Revisited; School's Out: The Cost of Dropping Out (video); Americandy: Sweet Land Of Liberty; Living Large: Obesity In America; the Cities Project; Farm Fresh Foods; Dirty Money, winner of a Sigma Delta Chi Award for Investigative Reporting, a Scripps Howard National Journalism Award and an Edward R. Murrow award; Friday Night Lives, winner of an Edward R. Murrow Award; and, WASP: Women With Wings In WWII, winner of a GRACIE Award.

Tanya is former editor for investigative and long-term projects at washingtonpost.com and during her tenure there coordinated with the print and digital newsrooms to develop multimedia content for investigative reports.

She is also a native of Charlotte, N.C., an alumna of N.C. A&T State University, and a former congressional fellow with the American Political Science Association. She has been a reporter or editor at GovExec.com/Government Executive magazine, The Tennessean in Nashville and the (Greensboro) News & Record.

In her free time, she fronts a band filled with other NPR staffers, sings show tunes, dances randomly in the middle of the newsroom, takes acting and improv classes, teaches at Georgetown University, does storytelling performances, and dreams of being a bass player. Or Sarah Vaughan. Whichever comes first. She lives in Washington, D.C.

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Story Archive

North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un and South Korea's President Moon Jae-in walk together after a tree-planting ceremony at the truce village of Panmunjom on April 27. Korea Summit Press Pool via/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Korea Summit Press Pool via/AFP/Getty Images

Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown warms up before a basketball game against the Chicago Bulls on Jan. 28 in Chicago. A few days before that game, Milwaukee police used a stun gun on and arrested him over a parking violation. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Journalist Tom Brokaw responded to the accusations: "The meetings were brief, cordial and appropriate, and despite Linda's allegations, I made no romantic overtures towards her at that time or any other." Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Former NBC Correspondent Accuses Tom Brokaw Of Sexual Misconduct

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Bill Cosby departs the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa., on Wednesday. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Bill Cosby Found Guilty Of All Charges In Sexual Assault Retrial

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Andrea Constand leaves the courtroom after closing arguments on June 12, 2017. The judge declared a mistrial when the jury couldn't reach a verdict after more than 50 hours of deliberation. David Maialetti/AP hide caption

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David Maialetti/AP

The Cosby Trial: What You Need To Know

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott signs the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Public Safety Act on Friday. The legislation includes a number of gun restrictions and also permits school personnel who are not full-time teachers to be armed. Mark Wallheiser/AP hide caption

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Mark Wallheiser/AP

A runner moves past a group of police officers gathered near the finish line of the New York City Marathon on Nov. 6, 2016. Authorities are increasing the number of officers and other law enforcement personnel for this year's race, in the wake of Tuesday's terrorist attack in the city, in which a truck struck and killed eight bicyclists. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP