Angel Carreras Angel Carreras is an assistant producer for The Indicator from Planet Money.
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Angel Carreras

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Headshot of Angel Carreras
Courtesy of Angel Carreras

Angel Carreras

Assistant Producer, The Indicator

Angel Carreras is an assistant producer for The Indicator from Planet Money. He is a Bakersfield-raised, Cal State Long Beach graduate. He previously worked at KCRW, the NPR member station in Los Angeles. He has produced award-winning and character-driven work, with subjects that have included masked puppeteers, mutual aid groups, and community activists.



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Wednesday

AUSTIN, TEXAS (Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images) Brandon Bell//Getty Images hide caption

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Wednesday

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Tuesday

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Darian Woods/Darian Woods

Wednesday

The explosive growth of Esports has made it so that elite-level competitive gamers can leverage their ability into a full-time job. But what does the life of a typical Esports pro look like and how do they think about their long-term prospects with Esports growth stagnating? Theresa O'Reilly for NPR hide caption

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Theresa O'Reilly for NPR

The boom and bust of esports

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Friday

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Thursday

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Tuesday

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Monday

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Monday

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Monday

Recompose

Wednesday

A farmer works at an avocado plantation at the Los Cerritos avocado group ranch in Ciudad Guzman, state of Jalisco, Mexico. Ulises Ruiz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ulises Ruiz/AFP via Getty Images

This data scientist has a plan for how to feed the world sustainably

According to the United Nations, about ten percent of the world is undernourished. It's a daunting statistic — unless your name is Hannah Ritchie. She's the data scientist behind the new book Not the End of the World: How We Can Be the First Generation to Build a Sustainable Planet. It's a seriously big thought experiment: How do we feed everyone on Earth sustainably? And because it's just as much an economically pressing question as it is a scientific one, Darian Woods of The Indicator from Planet Money joins us. With Hannah's help, Darian unpacks how to meet the needs of billions of people without destroying the planet.

This data scientist has a plan for how to feed the world sustainably

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Thursday

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Wednesday

A picture of the New Administrative Capital megaproject. It's one of Egypt's massive construction projects that's part of the president's economic vision. KHALED DESOUKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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KHALED DESOUKI/AFP via Getty Images

Friday

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A Swiftie Super Bowl, a stumbling bank, and other indicators

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Wednesday

Helder Faria

A manifesto for feeding 8 billion people

In her new book, Our World In Data's Head of Research Hannah Ritchie investigates how to meet the needs of people without destroying the planet. Today we ask Hannah: Can we feed the world, sustainably?

A manifesto for feeding 8 billion people

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