Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

The Senate Nears Confirming Trump's 3rd Supreme Court Justice

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How The Justice Department Has Changed Under Trump's Presidency

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Prosecutor Andrew Weissmann talked with reporters outside the federal courthouse in Houston in 2002. His new book reflects on the past and potential future of the Justice Department. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

Andrew Weissmann, Ex-Mueller Deputy, On Pardons, Barr And Investigating Trump

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Judge Amy Coney Barrett, here at the White House on Sept. 26, is President Trump's Supreme Court nominee — and she has gun control groups worried. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Gun Control Groups Voice 'Grave Concerns' About Supreme Court Nominee's Record

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The Rev. Paul Scalia, here in 2016, has apologized for not wearing a mask at a recent White House event, saying his actions "did not follow my own expectations, caused disquiet and anxiety, and have distracted from the work of the Gospel." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Amy Coney Barrett Nominated And Expected To Be Confirmed To Supreme Court

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Trump To Nominate New Supreme Court Justice As Nation Mourns Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Trump May Appoint Federal Judge Amy Coney Barrett To The Supreme Court

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Judge Amy Coney Barrett, pictured in 2018, is 48 years old and would likely serve for decades to come on the high court if confirmed by the Senate. Rachel Malehorn/rachelmalehorn.smugmug.com via AP hide caption

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Rachel Malehorn/rachelmalehorn.smugmug.com via AP