Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Pelosi's Democratic Challengers Go Public; Trump Says He Answered Mueller's Questions

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Maria Butina, a Russian woman who has been in custody since the summer facing charges that she is a foreign agent, may conclude a plea agreement with prosecutors. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Julian Assange speaks to the media from the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London last year. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

Court Filing Suggests Prosecutors Are Preparing Charges Against Julian Assange

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Unrelated Case Suggests U.S. Prepared Charges Against WikiLeaks' Assange

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The Senate has confirmed a number of judges nominated by President Trump to the federal bench, including two additions to the Supreme Court. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Congress May Be On The Verge Of A Major Overhaul To The Criminal Justice System

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Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's appointment was legal, a Justice Department memo concluded on Wednesday. Critics call it "unconstitutional" because he wasn't confirmed by the Senate. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, November 8

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News Brief: Jeff Sessions, White House Shake-Up And Voting In Florida

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When he was a U.S. senator from Alabama, Attorney General Jeff Sessions was among Donald Trump's earliest supporters in the 2016 campaign. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Jeff Sessions Forced Out As Attorney General After Constant Criticism From Trump

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President Richard Nixon with Vice President Gerald Ford. Nixon resigned on Aug. 9, 1974, rather than face the prospect of impeachment over Watergate. Historical/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Historical/Corbis via Getty Images

Long Sealed, Newly Released Watergate 'Road Map' Could Guide Russia Probe

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Feds Charge Man With Mailing Improvised Bombs To President Trump's Critics

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Suspect Arrested In Florida In Connection With Suspicious Packages

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