Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Recording artist Meek Mill is seen on April 2 at a Philadelphia gathering to push for changes to Pennsylvania's probation system. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

'Wake-Up Call' About A Broken System: New Study Shows Failings Of Probation, Parole

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The Justice Department under Attorney General William Barr has declined to defend in court the Affordable Care Act or a congressional ban on female genital mutilation. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Lawyer Reid Weingarten made his reputation by sending lawmakers to prison and investigating allegations in 1992 that a presidential campaign conspired with a foreign adversary to help its own election prospects. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

When Politics, Prosecution Collide: Veteran Lawyer Calls Current State 'Disturbing'

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Special Counsel Robert Mueller Makes First Public Comments On Russia Investigation

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Analysis Of Mueller's Justice Department Remarks

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Mueller Defends Office's Investigation Into Russian Interference In 2016 Election

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Mueller: Special Counsel Office To Close

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Robert Mueller is one of the most decorated law enforcement officers of his generation and was the longest-serving FBI leader since J. Edgar Hoover. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is taken from court, where he appeared on charges of jumping British bail seven years ago, in London on May 1. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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U.S. Brings New Charges Against Julian Assange In War Logs, State Cables Case

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Investigators say the FBI is tracking a changing terror threat, even as terrorists like John Walker Lindh complete their prison sentences. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federal Judge Orders More Information Released On Russia Investigation

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Attorney General Barr Appoints U.S. Attorney To Investigate Russia Probe Origins

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