Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Story Archive

Senators Hear Sharply Different Views On A.G. Nominee From Outside Witnesses

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Senators Push Trump's Attorney General Pick On Impartiality

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Senate Judiciary Committee Questions William Barr, Trump's Pick For Attorney General

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Then-Attorney General William Barr, left, with President George H.W. Bush. Barr supported Bush's pardons for six people caught up in the Iran-Contra scandal, which is resonating today. Marcy Nighswander/AP hide caption

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Marcy Nighswander/AP

William Barr Supported Pardons In An Earlier D.C. 'Witch Hunt': Iran-Contra

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Weekly Roundup: Thursday, January 10

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What Changes At The Justice Department Will Mean For The Russia Investigation

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Paul Manafort arrives for a hearing at U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., on June 15. A new court filing says Manafort is suspected of having shared polling data with a business associate who has links to the Russian intelligence service. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Work at the Justice Department's headquarters in Washington has been slower than normal because of the government shutdown. Even so, it's calling attention to administration priorities about the Southern border. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

House Democrats Hire New Top Lawyer To Defend Affordable Care Act

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A flag flies outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. The Trump administration's reshaping of the federal judiciary continued at a steady pace, with 18 new appeals court judges confirmed in 2018. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Federal Judge Delays Michael Flynn's Sentencing; Trump Foundation To Dissolve

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President Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn arrives at federal court in Washington. D.C., Tuesday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Federal Judge Delays Michael Flynn Sentencing After Plea Of Lying To Feds

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Cleric Fethullah Gulen spoke to reporters at his compound in Saylorsburg, Pa. His case was connected to new charges unveiled on Monday against associates of Michael Flynn. Chris Post/AP hide caption

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Chris Post/AP

A Head-Spinning Week In The Mueller Probe Produces A Sentence And A Plea

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