Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a justice correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the newscasts and NPR.org.

Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department, and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth, and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, SABEW, and the National Juvenile Defender Center. She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Michael Avenatti, attorney for Stephanie Clifford, speaks to reporters as he leaves the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California on Sept. 24, 2018, in Los Angeles. Avenatti has been arrested on federal bank fraud and wire fraud charges. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Did Trump Obstruct Justice? That's A Complicated Question

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Mueller Report Finds No Trump-Russia Collusion

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Special counsel Robert Mueller walks with his wife, Ann, in Washington, D.C., on Sunday. The Justice Department is expected to send a summary of his findings to Congress. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Special Counsel Submits Report On Russia Investigation. What Happens Next?

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What's Next Now That Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia Investigation Has Ended

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Mueller Delivers Findings From Russia Investigation To Attorney General Barr

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Copies of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Robert Mueller Submits Report On Russia Investigation To Attorney General

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In this sketch, Judge Amy Berman Jackson presides over a court hearing for Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington, D.C., in February. Jackson is among the women judges playing a central role in the Russia investigation. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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