Carrie Johnson Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.
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Carrie Johnson

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Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is NPR's National Justice Correspondent.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement, and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Johnson regularly appears on the NPR Politics Podcast.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Society for Professional Journalists, and SABEW. She served as a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University from 2019-2020. In 2021, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers honored Johnson with a rarely-bestowed Champion of Justice award for her journalism work.

She has been a finalist for the Loeb Award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois. She sits on the advisory board for the Center for Journalism Ethics at UW-M and the Historical Society of the D.C. Circuit.

Story Archive

Flowers, candles and mementoes are left at a makeshift memorial outside the Tops market on May 18, 2022 in Buffalo, New York. Police say the shooting that killed 10 and wounded three is being investigated as a racially motivated hate crime. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. District Chief Judge Debra M. Brown, left, jokes with District Judge Carlton Reeves for the Southern District of Mississippi, right, his law clerk George Brewster, second from left, and student James Minor, following a "gavel passing ceremony" in Greenville, Miss., Friday, June 11, 2021. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Former Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar appears in court for his final sentencing phase in Eaton County Circuit Court on February 5, 2018 in Charlotte, Michigan. RENA LAVERTY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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RENA LAVERTY/AFP via Getty Images

A truck is used to patrol the grounds of the Federal Correctional Complex Terre Haute on July 25, 2019 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Justice Department works to curb racial bias in deciding who's released from prison

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A view of The Crossing apartment building in Washington, D.C.'s Navy Yard neighborhood on April 8. The building, which was raided by the FBI on April 6, is the home of two men accused of posing as federal law enforcement employees and ingratiating themselves with U.S. Secret Service agents. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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How Congress Is Investigating January 6th — And Preparing For Any Future Attacks

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Ketanji Brown Jackson Confirmed To The Supreme Court

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A great egret stands near former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort on Feb. 11, as reports emerged that the National Archives had recovered documents from Trump's Palm Beach, Fla., home. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks during a press conference at the U.S. Justice Department on April 06, 2022 in Washington, DC. He tested positive for COVID-19 within hours of making remarks. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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